Toy Chest Theater: Obi-Wan Kenobi by @jdv_edits

By Rob Siebert
Fanboy Wonder

Tomorrow, Obi-Wan Kenobi wraps up on Disney+. While the series definitely has its share of critics (Some Star Wars fans really hate Star Wars…), I’m among those who’ve enjoyed the series overall.

In that spirit, here we have a Lego image from @jdv_edits, depicting the scene in “Part IV” where Obi-Wan holds back the ocean water from rushing in through the window. I think that what pushes this pic over the edge is how it’s lit. It’s not an exact replica of how that scene on the show was lit. But it’s enough to make it look like it should be in one of those Lego Star Wars games.

Lego Obi-Wan Kenobi, jdv_edits

Email Rob at primaryignition@yahoo.com, or check us out on Twitter.

George Lucas on Star Wars: The Kurosawa Influence

***Think what you will about George Lucas, but in terms of Star Wars, it can all be traced back to him. That’s why I always find it so interesting to listen to him talk about it. His creative process, the reason certain decisions were made, and how these movies became the pop cultural staples they are. This space is dedicated to just that. This is “George Lucas on Star Wars.”***

By Rob Siebert
Fanboy Wonder

C-3PO, R2-D2, Star Wars Episode IV A New Hope

The Scene: The original Star Wars film opens from the point of view of two droids, C-3PO and R2-D2.

George Lucas Says (via the A New Hope commentary track): “…we follow the two most insignificant characters, which are the droids. This was an idea I was enamored with that was used by Akira Kurosawa in The Hidden Fortress. Where you take the least important characters and you follow their story amongst this big intergalactic drama that they don’t understand.”

I Say: The influence of Akira Kurosawa’s work on Lucas and Star Wars has been widely documented. In George Lucas: A Life, Brian Daley notes that such influence included the “used, repaired, then used again” look of Kurosawa’s films, along with the practice of dropping audiences in the middle of a grand setting without the benefit of backstory, were also among the more notable elements Lucas borrowed for the original film.

Email Rob at primaryignition@yahoo.com, or check us out on Twitter.

A Do A Powerbomb! #1 Micro-Review – A Straight Up Victory

***This is where we keep it nice and simple. Comic book reviews in 100 words or less. Straight, concise, and to the point.***

Do A Powerbomb #1, cover, 2022, Daniel Warren JohnsonTITLE: Do A Powerbomb! #1
AUTHOR: Daniel Warren Johnson
ARTISTS:
Johnson, Mike Spicer (Colorist), Rus Wooton (Letterer)

RELEASED: June 15, 2022

By Rob Siebert
Fanboy Wonder

One issue in, and Do A Powerbomb! is already one of the better pro wrestling comics I’ve ever read. Granted, that’s not necessarily a high bar to reach. But all the more reason that it stands out.

The art has a nice, gritty texture to it. The action in the ring is fairly easy to follow, which is something I’ve found a lot of wrestling comics struggle with. Our protagonist is sympathetic and relatable. The otherworldly elements, suggested by the skeletons we see on the cover, are introduced in an intriguing way. I’ll be back for issue #2.

Email Rob at primaryignition@yahoo.com, or check us out on Twitter.

A Superman: Son of Kal-El #12 Micro-Review – Enough is Enough

***This is where we keep it nice and simple. Comic book reviews in 100 words or less. Straight, concise, and to the point.***

Superman Son of Kal El 12, cover, 2022, Travis MooreTITLE: Superman: Son of Kal-El #12
AUTHOR: Tom Taylor
ARTISTS:
Cian Tormey & Ruairi Coleman, Dave Sharpe (Letterer). Cover by Travis Moore & Tamra Bonvillain.
INKERS: Scott Hanna, Coleman, Raul Fernandez, Tormey
COLORISTS:
Federico Blee, Matt Herms

RELEASED: June 14, 2022

By Rob Siebert
Fanboy Wonder

I think I’ve officially had enough of Batman and Nightwing having a consistent presence in this book. Guest spots are fine. But as I’ve said many times before, we don’t need Batman characters here as window dressing.

This cover by Travis Moore and Tamra Bonvillain is one of my favorites on this series so far. For me, it’s all in Jon’s face. It looks genuine.

There’s an interesting twist here involving Jon’s boyfriend, Jay Nakamura, that offers a good amount of intrigue for issues to come. Things are about to get very, very personal…

Email Rob at primaryignition@yahoo.com, or check us out on Twitter.

Astonishing Art: RIP Tim Sale

By Rob Siebert
Fanboy Wonder

In honor of Tim Sale, who we lost yesterday at the age of 66, I now present just a small selection of his work. Sale’s work on Batman: The Long Halloween helped turn it into one of the most iconic Batman stories ever told, not to mention one of my favorites. But as you’ll see here, Sale’s work went far beyond the Dark Knight. The man could truly do it all, and the industry will miss him tremendously.

Thank you for the memories, Mr. Sale. And for all the truly amazing work.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Email Rob at primaryignition@yahoo.com, or check us out on Twitter.

A Star Wars: Obi-Wan Kenobi, “Part V” Review

SERIES: Star Wars: Obi-Wan Kenobi
EPISODE:
“Part V”
STARRING:
Ewan McGregor, Vivien Lyra Blair, Hayden Christensen, Moses Ingram, Indira Varma
WRITERS:
Joby Harold, Andrew Stanton
DIRECTOR:
Deborah Chow
PREMIERE DATE:
June 15, 2011
SYNOPSIS:
Obi-Wan, Tala, and the Path must escape an Imperial attack.

***New around here? Check out our Star Wars review archive!***

By Rob Siebert
Fanboy Wonder

I’m a little confused as to why people are questioning how “canon-friendly” Obi-Wan Kenobi is, because of this new connection we’re seeing between Obi-Wan and Leia. Granted, there’s nothing in A New Hope that suggests they knew each other. But there’s nothing that says they didn’t, either. The two character don’t even have any shared screen time in the movie. The closest they come to contact is when Leia presumably catches a glance of the fight between Obi-Wan and Darth Vader.

And yes, Leia is a little formal with Obi-Wan in the transmission that Artoo delivers. But it’s presumably been almost a decade since they’ve seen each other. A little decorum isn’t uncalled for. Thus far, Obi-Wan Kenobi fits into canon just fine. At least as far as I know.

Before our recap, we get a warning: “There are certain scenes in this fictional series that some viewers may find upsetting.” Given the temperament of a lot of the fans, it seems like that’s the kind of warning that should come before every Star Wars show…

These are the flashbacks I’ve been looking for! Granted, Hayden Christensen doesn’t look much like the teenager that Anakin is supposed to be. But it almost doesn’t matter. Even as someone who’s willing to be critical of the prequels and their shortcomings, it’s thrilling to see him in the role again.

Wait, I’m confused. In his transmission to Obi-Wan, Bail says: “If he’s found you, if he’s learned of the children…”

He’s talking about Darth Vader, right? That seems to imply that Obi-Wan tipped Bail off that Anakin had survived as Vader. But when did he do that? Why did he do that? That “If he’s found you…” line is frustrating in that it unintentionally raises nagging questions.

We learn here that Reva was a youngling that Anakin stabbed during Order 66, but survived. Her fixation on finding Obi-Wan was wrapped up in her hatred for Anakin, and that he couldn’t prevent Anakin’s fall and subsequent slaughter of those close to her.

This works fairly well as Reva’s motivation. I like that she’s after Vader more than she is Obi-Wan. It speaks to the idea that all these Sith secretly hate each other, and when the chips are down will turn on one another.

And so Tala dies a heroic death via thermal detonator. Yeah, that feels about right. You knew she wasn’t going to make it through the series. You just knew it…

Someone who evidently will make it through the series? The Grand Inquisitor, who returns at the end of the episode. Many speculated this might be the case. And his big line, Revenge does wonders for the will to live, don’t you think?” is awesome.

By the way, does the Grand Inquisitor have a name? We briefly see the rank of Grand Inquisitor bestowed upon Reva in this episode. So we know it’s a title, not a name. So what is Rupert Friend’s character’s actual name? Did Rebels ever cover that?

At the end of the episode, Reva discovers Bail’s recorded message to Obi-Wan, which reveals Luke’s location. I had a feeling things would come back around to Tatooine at the end. And I’ve got a theory about how things may go…

Years ago, in conjunction with the release of Revenge of the Sith, Dark Horse Comics put out an anthology miniseries called Star Wars Visionaries. In one of the stories, “Old Wounds,” a revived Darth Maul arrives at the Lars Homestead looking for Luke. (This was obviously published years before Maul was canonically revived on the Clone Wars animated show.) Obi-Wan arrives and a battle ensues. But ultimately, it’s Owen Lars who surprises Maul with a head shot, killing him instantly…

Could we be looking at a similar scenario with Reva in the Obi-Wan Kenobi finale? It would be consistent with the Owen Lars we saw in the first episode

Email Rob at primaryignition@yahoo.com, or check us out on Twitter.

Toy Chest Theater: Buzz and Lightyear by Cyril Mallet

By Rob Siebert
Fanboy Wonder

I couldn’t resist doing another “Toy Chest Theater” this week when I spotted this image from Cyril Mallet. He’s been featured here before, with the Toy Story characters no less, and I’d say he’s outdone himself this time. Lightyear comes out today, and here we have Buzz Lightyear in toy form seeing his name in lights.

Email Rob at primaryignition@yahoo.com, or check us out on Twitter.

The Essential Clone Wars: “Brain Invaders”

***I must confess that, despite being a huge Star Wars geek, I have yet to see the landmark Clone Wars animated show in its entirety. I’m aiming to rectify that to a large extent here, as we look at pivotal episodes of the series in, “The Essential Clone Wars.”

SERIES: Star Wars: The Clone Wars
EPISODE:
S2:E8 – “Brain Invaders”
WITH THE VOICE TALENTS OF:
Ashley Eckstein, Meredith Salenger, Dee Bradley Baker, Matt Lanter, James Arnold Taylor
WRITER:
Andrew Kreisberg
DIRECTOR:
Steward Lee
PREMIERE DATE:
December 4, 2009
SYNOPSIS:
Republic forces fall under the influence of mind-controlling Geonosian worms.

***New around here? Check out our Star Wars review archive!***

This episode was written by Andrew Kreisberg, one of the architects of the “Arrowverse” on the CW Network. Some pretty cool Green Arrow/Black Canary comics too.

“Brain Invaders” has a great horror-esque premise, with some great visuals to match. It’s tough not to cringe when you watch one of the brain worms crawl into someone’s ear. Ditto for when they burst from someone’s mouth.

About six minutes into the episode, Ahsoka invites some of the clones to eat with her and Bariss Offee. I can’t help but think that’s got to be some of the most stale, unstimulating conversation in history. You’ve got two Jedi, who are essentially space monks, talking to genetically engineered clones who’ve only been alive for…what? A year, if that? And that’s before you factor in that the clones are being controlled by Geonosian brain worms. The social masochist in me really wants to see that scene…

Moments after the dining invitation, Ahsoka has a pretty stupid line. The clones start shooting at she and Bariss, and she calls out, “Troopers! Stand down!” They’re shooting at you, you dumb kid! I think the command hierarchy has been, at best, suspended!

The interrogation scene between Anakin and Poggle the Lesser is some nice Vader foreshadowing. The most important aspect being that, with Ahsoka in mortal danger, Anakin had a good reason to bend the rules the way he did.

Email Rob at primaryignition@yahoo.com, or check us out on Twitter.

Toy Chest Theater: Chris Evans as Buzz Lightyear

By Rob Siebert
Fanboy Wonder

In honor of Lightyear coming out this week, I couldn’t help but share these images from @marvelousactionfigurespose. With a little bit of head swapping, he was able to put a live action Chris Evans into the Buzz Lightyear costume we all know so well. His poses come off very lifelike. Or in the case of the middle pic, very evocative of a comic book cover.

Go ahead. Look at these pics and try to sell me that Chris Evans couldn’t be a live action Buzz Lightyear. I’ll wait…

Email Rob at primaryignition@yahoo.com, or check us out on Twitter.

George Lucas on Star Wars: Boba Fett’s “Death”

***Think what you will about George Lucas, but in terms of Star Wars, it can all be traced back to him. That’s why I always find it so interesting to listen to him talk about it. His creative process, the reason certain decisions were made, and how these movies became the pop cultural staples they are. This space is dedicated to just that. This is “George Lucas on Star Wars.”***

By Rob Siebert
Fanboy Wonder

Boba Fett, Return of the Jedi

The Scene: Han Solo accidentally smacks Boba Fett’s jet pack with a weapon, jump-starting his jet pack and sending him falling into the sarlaac pit below, presumably to his demise.

George Lucas Says (via the Return of the Jedi commentary track): “In the case of Boba Fett’s death, had I known he was going to turn into such a popular character I probably would have made it a little more exciting. Boba Fett was just another one of the minions. Another one of the bounty hunters and bad guys. But he became such a favorite … for having such a small part, he had a very large presence. And now that his history has been told in the [prequel] trilogy, it makes it even more of a misstep that we wouldn’t make more out of the event of his defeat. Because most people don’t believe he died anyway. I had contemplated putting that extra shot in where he climbs out of the hole. But I figured it doesn’t quite fit. The main character that ultimately dies in this scene is Jabba the Hutt.”

I Say: “It’s a little refreshing to hear George admit a mistake here. He’s a guy that usually sticks to his guns. But with almost 40 years of hindsight, it’s pretty tough to deny that Fett went out like a chump. Years after the fact, Lucas would make a similar admission about his decision to kill off Darth Maul in The Phantom Menace.

It’s even more interesting that George acknowledges that the fans didn’t buy that as his death. It makes you wonder if he’d have made Fett part of the sequel trilogy, had he gone forward with his version of the movies.

Fett was, of course, brought back for various novels and comic books in the old “Legends” canon. And now, Disney has made his return official with The Mandalorian and The Book of Boba Fett. So I guess he didn’t go out like a chump after all…

Email Rob at primaryignition@yahoo.com, or check us out on Twitter.