Tag Archives: Toy Chest Theater

Toy Chest Theater: Deadpool vs. Wolverine

By Rob Siebert
Fanboy Wonder

I’m not sure you can pack more action movie style fun into an image than Doctor Van Nostrand did here.

Firstly, you’ve got the simple fact that it’s Deadpool vs. Wolverine. They’re two of the most popular anti-heroes in all of comics, and both of them essentially have “I don’t die” super powers. They could literally fight forever. All the Hugh Jackman jokes in the Deadpool movies don’t hurt either.

Then there’s the pose. A perfectly serviceable kick to the face, supplemented by the scrunched up angry face this Wolverine figure has. From a distance, it creates a great illusion of impact. This is a gorgeous setting too. The kicked-up dust gives subtle impression that they’ve been scuffling for at least a few minutes. We’ve past the initial explosion of the fight.

But what seals the deal for yours truly is a detail you might miss if you’re simply scanning the image quickly. (Or maybe I’m just ADD like that.) Deadpool’s face is turned toward the camera, and he’s giving the audience a thumbs-up with his left hand. Thus, this image not only created a dynamic action pose, but a scene that’s perfectly suited to Deadpool.

Frankly, just looking at it makes me hungry for a chimichanga.

Follow Primary Ignition on Twitter, or email Rob at primaryignition@yahoo.com.

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Toy Chest Theater: Thanos and…Pooh?

By Rob Siebert
Fanboy Wonder

What the hell is this?

I don’t mean that in a bad way at all. I’m spotlighting this image, after all. But what the hell is this?

The really funny thing about this image by Hyaruron is that because both the Marvel and Winnie the Pooh brands are owned by Disney, this is one of those scenes that could conceivably happen someday. Like in a Who Framed Roger Rabbit? or Ralph Breaks the Internet type movie.

God only knows what these two would say to each other in a scene like this. But there are two elements that really made this image stick in my mind. The first is the out of focus log (or is it a branch?) in the foreground. It gives the image a certain voyeuristic feel. Like the photographer is sneaking up on them. The second is the placement of Pooh’s arm. It’s like he’s comforting Thanos. Possibly because he knows he’s going to lose in the next movie…

Incidentally, can someone tell me why Pooh is wearing that outfit? I’ve poked around looking for that figure, and can’t find it. There’s nothing wrong with it, of course. It’s just that, like this image itself, it’s really random.

Follow Primary Ignition on Twitter, or email Rob at primaryignition@yahoo.com.

Toy Chest Theater: Spider-Man Fails?

By Rob Siebert
Fanboy Wonder

This image makes me think of the art we saw in the aftermath of 9/11. Images of the superheroes we love, placed next to the very real heroes who rushed in to save lives and provide aid when the terrorist attacks occurred. John Romita Jr’s work in The Amazing Spider-Man #36 comes to mind, for obvious reasons.

The caption on photographer Joe Hume’s Instagram page reads “Sometimes we fail.” That’s interesting, as that’s not how I read this image. Mourning? Yes. Failure? No. But that seems to be the story Hume had in mind. Fair enough, I suppose.

Either way, it’s a powerful image. The iconography of the Spider-Man suit and the fireman’s hat. The orange blaze in the background. But the lighting from below is what clinches it. I don’t know that it’s supposed to be from the fire. A street light, perhaps. Or a light on one of the buildings. But it works very well.

Follow Primary Ignition on Twitter, or email Rob at primaryignition@yahoo.com.

Toy Chest Theater: Bird Box Starring TMNT

By Rob Siebert
Fanboy Wonder

I’ve got a soft spot for Bird Box, for obvious reasons. Mrs. Primary Ignition and I finally got to watch it the other night, and really enjoyed it.

So naturally, I love this image from Eric, a.k.a. @heatfour on Instagram.

In Bird Box, Sandra Bullock’s character has to guide to children through the wilderness as a ghostly monster pursues them. To further complicate matters, all three have to be blindfolded. It’s a very TMNT-ish look, so this shot is a natural play-off of the movie. Plus, using the figures based on the 1990 film always gets you extra points with me.

Intended or not, this image also has a certain intrigue to it in terms of the kids. How the heck did we get young mutant turtles? Are they supposed to be Raph’s kids? If so, how did that process work?

This image needs a backstory. Just sayin’.

Follow Primary Ignition on Twitter, or email Rob at primaryignition@yahoo.com.

Toy Chest Theater: Star Wars by Marcel Eisele

By Rob Siebert
Fanboy Wonder

“Holy sh*t, this guy’s good!”

Did I say those words out loud when I saw Marcel Eisele’s images for the first time? No. But it almost happened. That’s got to count for something.

I’ve selected aside six shots for display, and narrowing the field was not easy. I opted to stick to Star Wars stuff, as that’s the arena he spends most of his time in. But on Eisele’s Instagram page,¬†you’ll also see characters from Marvel, Planet of the Apes, The Walking Dead, IT, among others. Honestly, some shots were downright painful to leave out. So don’t be surprised if you see him in this space again down the road…

What I find so amazing about Eisele’s work is that he’s able to do so much with so little. Or at least what seems like so little. Take this shot of Mace Windu. It’s really just a tight shot with a lighting effect. But given the face sculpt, and Eisele using just the right amount of lighting to keep half the figure’s face in the shadow, the end result has so much gravity. Imagine walking into this guy on the dark end of the street. Yeesh. A little bit of pee just came out.

In a write-up done by BanthaSkull.com about a year ago, Eisele mentions taking a lot of shots in his backyard. I can only assume that’s where this was taken. It’s tough to go wrong with a silhouette. Don’t discount the timing element here. It feels like sunsets go by really fast when you’re trying to beat the clock.

Again, seemingly very simple. What we have here is basically a superhero shot of Luke on Ahch-To. You get the right angle, and the cape and the background do most of the work. But what is the right angle? How far back go you go? How much of the terrain do you show? How do you nail the figure’s positioning? Somehow, Eisele answered all these questions correctly. Because what he gave us here is damn near iconic.

Here’s one that hits you right in the damn feels. We never did get to see Luke and Han on screen together one last time. It might have a Grumpy Old Men vibe to it. But who cares? It’s Luke and Han.

Eisele also does some customization, as is the case with these next two shots. I appreciate this one because it sneaks up on you. When you’re scrolling by, it’s easy to assume that’s Luke behind Rey. But when you actually look at it, you’re surprised to see it’s an alt-universe Han Solo. Rocking the Jedi Master beard, no less.

Then there’s this last one, which I absolutely love the imagination behind. A custom-made “Dark Side Obi-Wan Kenobi.” There’s also a shot of this figure with a red lightsaber, thus unofficially classifying him as an evil Sith. But I like this image better, as I’m not in love with the idea of an evil Obi-Wan. By not drawing focus with the lightsaber, this pic allows us to take in all the differences between this character and the one we knew from A New Hope. The bald head, the longer beard, the bare feet, the tattered and dirty robes. I like to imagine this figure as Obi-Wan from a darker timeline, as opposed to being on the dark side himself. Perhaps not Old Ben Kenobi, but Older Ben Kenobi.

Follow Primary Ignition on Twitter, or email Rob at primaryignition@yahoo.com.

Toy Chest Theater: Horror Icons by Jeremy Hale

By Rob Siebert
Fanboy Wonder

I don’t do horror very much. Nothing against it. Just isn’t my thing. Still, the overlap with the world of comic books is rather obvious. So it makes sense that they’d land in this space.

It makes even more sense when you see that the amazing Jeremy Hale does quite a bit of work with horror action figures. Case in point, the images you see here, which are among my favorites in his portfolio…

Hill has a tendency to photograph his figures with woodsy dioramas. When paired with the right lighting, it creates a deliciously ominous vibe. As always, my standard for great action figure photography is that, at least for a brief moment, it makes you forget you’re looking at a toy. All three of these images accomplish that.

What is it about water? With the right figure(s), the right lighting, and the right photographer, it can turn a strictly decent image into a great one. That’s the case with Jason and Pennywise here. Particularly in Jason’s case, as he’s got the lake in his origin story. Plus, the shot almost brings the viewer into the scene as his next victim…

More of Jeremy Hale’s work can be found on ActionFigureFriday.com, as well as his Instagram.

Follow Primary Ignition on Twitter, or email Rob at primaryignition@yahoo.com.

Toy Chest Theater: Groot and Ant-Man by pop_tastic_man

By Rob Siebert
Fanboy Wonder

Once in awhile, we get a shot that’s pure magic. Indeed, if I had to sum up this piece in one word, it would be magic.

What pop_tastic_man creates here is a truly wondrous, awe-inspiring moment between Baby Groot and Ant-Man. The bright expression on the face is perfect. Plus, there’s something about the way this picture highlights the detail in the figure’s hand. Somehow, that’s what drew me in and sealed the deal on this one.

Either way, this image wouldn’t be at all out of place in the trailer for a big Marvel Cinematic Universe release. Truly epic.

Follow Primary Ignition on Twitter, or email Rob at primaryignition@yahoo.com.