Astonishing Art: Star Wars Trilogy by Florey

By Rob Siebert
Going from Boy to Man…Very Slowly.

I’m a sucker for posters like these. Ones that maintain a consistent design and take you through multiple stories, often following the same character.

Yes, I’m a little late for Star Wars Day with this one. But let’s be honest: This site has never been hurting for Star Wars content. Ergo, I present to you Florey’s take on Luke Skywalker’s journey in the original Star Wars Trilogy.

The posters are for sale now at Bottleneck Gallery. Florey can also be found on Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter.

The Rise of Skywalker Novelization Review – Leia Edition

***I just recently finished the Rise of Skywalker novelization. Naturally, as the “Expanded Edition,” it’s intended to supplement the events of the film and hopefully fill some of those gaping plotholes. Naturally as a Star Wars geek, I’ve got opinions. Too many to fit into a single review. Thus, welcome to the second of my multi-part Rise of Skywalker novelization review!***

By Rob Siebert
Would not be called “General Rob”

1. “General Leia”
When The Force Awakens came out, I understand why she was marketed as “General Leia.” The world had known her as Princess Leia for almost 40 years. Calling her General Organa, or even General Leia Organa, might be confusing for some. I don’t think the name Organa is said at any point in the original trilogy.

In the movies they did the right thing. She wasn’t General Leia. She was General Organa. Or just Leia. But in the Rise novelization she’s called “General Leia” a handful of times. It’s off-putting. Consider this: In Return of the Jedi we didn’t have General Han or General Lando. It was General Solo and General Calrissian.

So let’s get this down once and for all: In licensing meetings she can be General Leia. But in-story? She’s General Organa.

2. Luke Was Speaking to Leia From Beyond.
As the story begins, Leia knows she’s dying. Thanks in no small part to getting blown into space during The Last Jedi. She knew she had to maximize the time she had left. What’s more, she had a persistent voice telling her that her time to go was now.

Between helping Rey and bugging Leia, Luke was a busy Force Ghost.

Their first exchange in the book is simply…
“Leia. It’s time.”
“Not just yet.”

Brother later told sister, “There is only one thing left. Then you can rest.”

Finally, when Leia sacrificed herself reaching out to Ben and passes into the Force, she feels “a surge of welcome from Luke, who was not alone…”

I’d like to think he’s not talking about all the other Jedi we hear from later. Though that would mean she’d get to see her father, and even Obi-Wan Kenobi. To yours truly, the ideal vision is Anakin, Padme, Luke, Leia, and Han. The Skywalker family reunited in full. Sticklers will tell us that neither Padme nor Han could have preserved their consciousness in the Force.

But it’s intentionally left vague. I imagine there’s a reason for that.

3. Leia’s Jedi Training
With Luke gone, Leia was the only one left who could offer Rey anything remotely resembling Jedi training. She wasn’t a Jedi herself. But as we’d later learn, she was very much a qualified teacher.

The novel delightfully yet briefly touches on Luke’s training of Leia. Nothing too extensive. But we learn that her training, or at least much of it, took place on Ajan Kloss, the planet the Resistance is based on when the story begins. Luke would often compare Leia’s training to his with Yoda. Thus, he tended to refer to Ajan Kloss as “nice Dagobah.”

Certain things came naturally to Leia. Not long after the Battle of Endor, Luke tried to teach Leia a lesson in patience by having her stand on her head for a long period of time. Much like he did with Yoda. In response to taunts he threw her way, she used the Force floated up and on to her feet. “You’re going to make me a better teacher,” Luke said.

4. The Tantive IV
Remember the first ship we see in the original Star Wars? The blockade runner that gets captured by the Star Destroyer? Yeah, apparently that’s not only still functioning 34 years later, but it’s in this damn story. It’s even in the big space battle at the end. It goes down, though. Among the casualties aboard are Nien Nunb, Lando’s co-pilot from Return of the Jedi.

This movie and it’s original trilogy collectibles. Honestly.

5. “Leia Was Stronger Than All of Us”
Luke says that to Rey during their scene on Ach-To.

This book practically worships Leia. Which I’m actually okay with. Not because of Carrie Fisher’s death, though that does make it more poignant. It’s because in the end, Leia was the strongest person in the saga. There’s actually a line in the book

Rian Johnson touched on this in the commentary track for The Last Jedi. Over the course of her life, Leia…

– Was taken from her birth parents.
– Lost her adoptive parents when her world exploded, as she was forced to stand by and watch.
– Discovered her father was Darth Vader, who was the one to hold her in place and make her watch aforementioned explosion.
– Lost her son to the dark side, just as Vader had been lost to it.
– Lost her husband when he was murdered by aforementioned son.
– Lost her brother when he sacrificed himself to save the Resistance.
– Endured the death of so many friends. In the sequel trilogy she also lost Holdo, who’d been a childhood friend, and Admiral Ackbar, whom she’d known since the days of the Rebellion.

And yet, when the galaxy needed her to fight, she kept on fighting.

Turns out Leia, like Carrie Fisher, was as tough as they come.

Email Rob at primaryignition@yahoo.com, or check us out on Twitter.

A Star Wars #8 Review – Whiny Luke Skywalker Returns

Star Wars #8, 2015, Stuart ImmonenTITLE: Star Wars #8
AUTHOR: Jason Aaron
PENCILLER: Stuart Immonen
PUBLISHER: Marvel
PRICE: $3.99
RELEASED: August 19, 2015

By Rob Siebert
Editor, Fanboy Wonder

After last issue’s awesome glimpse into the journals of Obi-Wan Kenobi, there was a decent amount of hype heading into Star Wars #8. How would Luke use what he had learned from Obi-Wan’s writings? And what of Sana Solo, Han’s apparently estranged wife? What does the fall out from such an incredible revelation look like? And by the way, the Empire’s about to unleash Hell from on high, threatening to blow Han, Leia, and Sana to smithereens! After a prolonged wait, we were ready to see what happened next…

Damn it, Jason Aaron. Damn it, damn it, damn it.

Let’s go to Han, Leia and Sana first. The big revelation from issue #6 is followed up with what basically amounts to a teenage boy being confronted by his ex while he’s with his new girlfriend. Han says a lot of the clumsy dialogue you’d expect from such a scene.

  • “Sana. Where did you…how…how did you…?”Star-Wars-8-Han-Leia-Sana
  • “She’s not my wife! Leia, wait…”
  • “Leia, don’t listen to her. It was never like that…She’s not my wife!”
  • “Sana, stop this! What do you think you’re doing?”

And blah, blah, blah. We don’t learn much about Sana’s origins, here. Or how she came to be “married” to Han. She essentially comes off like a crazy scorned lover who’s out to o away with Leia and take Han back for herself. This motivation is fine. But what’s frustrating is that we learn so little about who this person is. She’s apparently a bounty hunter, and she allegedly has documents to back up her marriage claims. But we don’t get any hints about her history with Han. How they met, where she wants to take him back to, etc. We don’t need the whole story, obviously. But give us something to hold us over until we do get more definitive answers.

When we jump to Luke, he’s in his X-Wing with Artoo, which is where we left him at the end of issue #8. The vibe I got from that final page was that Obi-Wan’s journal gave him sort of a warm, fuzzy feeling about his mentor. But when we see him in this book, he’s almost whining about how the journal only contains stories, and nothing about “fighting with a lightsaber or using the force.” So at what point did he go from warm to whiny?

Star Wars #8, Nar ShaadaaLuke lands on Nar Shaddaa, a.k.a. “The Smuggler’s Moon,” in hopes of gaining transport to…well, I won’t spoil it. But it’s somewhere rich in Jedi history. So he walks into what he describes as the worst-looking bar around, totally outmatched. He winds up breaking out the lightsaber, which only serves to draw more unwanted attention. All in all, Luke comes off looking downright stupid, and in WAY over his head.

This book has been good about showing how young and inexperienced Luke is at this point in his life. We’ve seen him foolishly try to take on Darth Vader, blindly swing a lightsaber at Boba Fett (though that was pretty cool), and now this. Aaron needs to find the line between inexperienced and just plain stupid. After all, this guy is the main hero of the original trilogy. Even at a young age, Luke is at least competent, isn’t he? He had it together during the Battle of Yavin, as I recall.

This is Stuart Immonen’s first outing on Star Wars, and not surprisingly, he does fine. His more animated style takes some getting used to after six issues with John Cassaday, and last issue’s outing with Simone Bianchi. The best work he does with inker Wade Von Grawbadger and colorist Justin Ponsor occur when Luke breaks out the lightsaber in the bar, and we see the bar’s shadowy atmosphere contrast with the brightness of the blade. He’ll likely get even better once he’s had time to get used to this universe.

Compared to what Kieron Gillen and Salvador Larroca are turning in on Darth Vader, Star Wars continues to be the inferior book in terms of both consistency and quality. But it’s still worth picking up. Jason Aaron continues to get a lot wrong. But there’s also quite a bit he gets right.

Image 1 from dorksideoftheforce.com. Image 2 from marvel.com.

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