Posted in Wrestling

Wrestlemania 37 Night Two Predictions

By Rob Siebert
Fanboy Wonder

Whether it’s one night or two, Wrestlemania only has one main event.

As much as people want to talk about various different matches “main eventing” this show, I subscribe to what I’ll call the “CM Punk Theory of Main Events.” It’s like he said on the famous Colt Cabana podcast years ago: The main event is the last match. It’s the note you leave your audience on. It’s your crescendo. It’s what you build your show toward

Like it or not, this year that main event spot belongs to Roman Reigns, Edge, and Daniel Bryan. I could have gone to Sasha Banks and Bianca Belair. Or even Bobby Lashley and Drew McIntyre. But unless a wild move gets pulled, the Universal Title Match is going to headline Wrestlemania. And based on the quality of its build-up compared to the other matches, that’s the right decision.

But night two has a lot going for it outside of a great main event…

Kevin Owens vs. Sami Zayn

These guys have worked together a million times, and in a million places. Nonetheless, I’m sure getting to work Wrestlemania is special for them. I’m hoping they can turn in something special for Owens’ sake if nothing else. It’s not hard to see that WWE takes him for granted.

I’m proud to say I knew who Logan Paul was before he showed up on Smackdown. I have no idea how he’ll factor into this match. But he can’t not be a factor, can he?

Sami Zayn has a good thing going as a heel. So I see Logan costing Owens the match. Hopefully, Owens gets to powerbomb Logan off the stage or something afterward.

PREDICTION: Sami Zayn

NIGERIAN DRUM FIGHT FOR WWE INTERCONTINENTAL TITLE:
Big E. (c) vs. Apollo Crews

So…is Crews really Nigerian? For what it’s worth, his Wikipedia page says he was born in Sacramento and raised in Atlanta.

What’s a Nigerian Drum Fight? I dunno, and chances are they won’t know until the last minute either. So I’m not going to waste brain cells on it.

Big E. has beaten Crews every step of the way up to this point. So it wouldn’t make sense to book this match unless WWE wanted Crews to win the title. Granted, sense isn’t always their strong point. But throw in the fact that this is “his” match, and I think Crews walks out with the belt.

PREDICTION: Apollo Crews

WWE UNITED STATES TITLE MATCH:
Riddle (c) vs. Sheamus

Based on what these two have turned in previously, this match has as much a chance as any of stealing this show this year. Sheamus, in particular, has been on one of the best runs of his career.

Still, I think Vince McMahon is into Riddle. They put the title on him, they added those weird CGI birds to his entrance, and he apparently didn’t get in any trouble despite forgetting his lines on Raw last week. So I’m thinking Riddle comes out on top here.

PREDICTION: Riddle

WWE RAW WOMEN’S TITLE MATCH:
Asuka (c) vs. Rhea Ripley

If they have any desire to make a star out of Rhea Ripley, she has to win at some point, right? She lost to Charlotte Flair last year, then she came up short in the Women’s Royal Rumble Match this year. If she doesn’t come out on top here, how do we not label her as a loser?

Fortunately, I think this is her moment. Even if Charlotte were to pop up at the last minute and make this a triple-threat, I think Rhea wins. She’s earned her moment. So let’s give it to her.

PREDICTION: Rhea Ripley

“The Fiend” Bray Wyatt vs. Randy Orton

Last year, WWE had Bray Wyatt go over John Cena in what was commonly seen as an attempt to erase the mistake of having Cena beat Wyatt at Wrestlemania 30. Similarly, I suspect this is an attempt for these two to redeem themselves after their stinker of a match at Wrestlemania 33. And I think this time we get the right finish and Bray goes over.

The only question for me is how they get Alexa Bliss involved here? Because you know she’s not sitting out Wrestlemania.

PREDICTION: Bray Wyatt

TRIPLE-THREAT MATCH FOR WWE UNIVERSAL HEAVYWEIGHT TITLE:
Roman Reigns (c) vs. Edge vs. Daniel Bryan

A reasonable argument can be made for all three of these men winning this match.

Edge has the classic comeback story. He was away from wrestling for nine years, shocked the world when he came back, then he won the Royal Rumble. Winning the title in the main event of Wrestlemania is a fairy tale ending, to say the least.

Daniel Bryan is the wild card. But he’s also the apparent babyface, what with Edge having taken on more of a heel role in recent weeks. The fans do genuinely love him, and having him come out on top would send a lot of fans home happy.

Then there’s Roman Reigns, the dominant monster heel champion. Since coming back at Summerslam, Reigns has been on the best run of his career. It’s been so good, in fact, that I can see him getting the win and continuing that dominant streak into the foreseeable future.

That, I think, is the path to take here. Reigns has been in the Wrestlemania main event four times previously, and each time fans vocally questioned whether he deserved to be there. This time there is no question. Roman Reigns has reached the top, and I expect he’ll stay at the top.

PREDICTION: Roman Reigns

Email Rob at primaryignition@yahoo.com, or check us out on Twitter.

Posted in Wrestling

Wrestlemania 37 Night One Predictions

By Rob Siebert
Fanboy Wonder

I really can’t help it. Despite how bad Raw continues to be every Monday Night, I’m trained to care about Wrestlemania season. It’s been ingrained in me since I was 11 years old. That, and the fact that this’ll be the first WWE show in front of fans since the pandemic started, and my curiosity is piqued in terms of Wrestlemania 37.

One thing I’m slightly encouraged by as I look at this year’s card is the relative lack of part-timers on the show. We have no Brock Lesnar, no Triple H, no John Cena, and no Undertaker. I’m not one of these fans who rallies against part-timers being on the roster. But it is encouraging to see WWE give some of these Wrestlemania big spots to it’s regular, full-time performers. That’s part of how you make new stars.

And one of those new stars will hopefully be Bianca Belair…

wrestlemania_37_sasha_banks_bianca_belairWWE SMACKDOWN WOMEN’S TITLE MATCH:
Sasha Banks (c) vs. Bianca Belair

Apparently, Bobby Lashley and Drew McIntyre are going to close this first night. If that’s the case, then Sasha Banks and Bianca Belair should definitely open. Frankly, you can make a pretty convincing argument for it being the other way around.

This match needs to be about making a new star. This should indeed be Belair’s crowning moment, and I don’t doubt she’ll get it. I’ve got high hopes for this one whether it opens the show or not. Belair is a tremendous athlete and personality, and Banks has proven she can deliver in big match situations. Here’s hoping they deliver.

PREDICTION: Bianca Belair

Wrestlemania 37, Lana, Naomi, Dana Brooke, Mandy Rose, Liv Morgan, Ruby Riott, Natalya, TaminaFATAL FOUR-WAY TAG TEAM MATCH:
The Riott Squad vs. Dana Brooke & Mandy Rose vs. Lana & Naomi vs. Natalya & Tamina
Winners to challenge for WWE Women’s Tag Team Titles on Night Two.

This one is a toss-up. Lots of sentimental favorites. But I’m going to go with the Riott Squad. Ruby Riott and Liv Morgan have the most history as a team and have earned a high profile spot like this. I don’t think they’ll end up winning the titles from Nia Jax and Shayna Baszler. But it’ll be nice to see them get a big win nonetheless.

PREDICTION: The Riott Squad

Wrestlemania 37, New Day, AJ Styles and OmosWWE RAW TAG TEAM TITLE MATCH:
The New Day (c) vs. AJ Styles & Omos

I’m picking Styles and Omos for a few reasons. Firstly, it’s Omos’ first match on the main roster. They don’t want to bring him in with a loss, like they did with poor Dabba-Kato. (Remember Dabba-Kato? Me neither.)

Secondly, the Raw tag team division desperately needs new blood. We can only watch the New Day against Shelton Benjamin and Cedric Alexander so many times. Styles and Omos will be new faces, if nothing else. And putting Omos in the ring with Styles will only work in his favor as far as his in-ring acumen goes. All in all, this one’s a pretty easy pick.

PREDICTION: AJ Styles & Omos

Wrestlemania 37, Cesaro, Seth RollinsSeth Rollins vs. Cesaro

I love this match, for no other reason than it gives Cesaro a Wrestlemania match. I’ve got high hopes for this one too, as I’m sure Rollins wants to give Cesaro a hell of a match. I’m equally sure he wants to put him over, which is why Cesaro is my pick to win. Whether they’re willing to give Cesaro a big moment like that remains to be seen.

PREDICTION: Cesaro

Wrestlemania 37, Braun Strowman, Shane McMahonSTEEL CAGE MATCH:
Shane McMahon vs. Braun Strowman

I’m assuming this is the kind of Cage Match where you can win by escaping. Thus, Strowman and Shane will have some climbing to do. And thus, Shane will end up falling off the cage. Not sure why they’d want to do that, considering they can’t top his fall off Hell in a Cell in Dallas several years ago. But that’s their prerogative.

Trouble is, if the winner is the one who escapes the cage first, that means Shane wins and Braun looks stupid. Maybe that’s the idea…

PREDICTION: Shane McMahon

Wrestlemania 37, Damien Priest, Bad Bunny, The Miz, John MorrisonBad Bunny & Damien Priest vs. The Miz & John Morrison

Whether people like it or not, Bad Bunny’s celebrity appeal makes this a marquee match. It’s a hell of a spot for Damien Priest to be in as well, so soon after his call-up from NXT.

This is another easy pick. The celebrities always win these things, for obvious reasons. Plus, if Floyd Mayweather can beat the Big Show, Bad Bunny can beat the Miz.

PREDICTION: Bad Bunny & Damien Priest

Wrestlemania 37, Bobby Lashley, Drew McIntyreWWE WORLD HEAVYWEIGHT TITLE MATCH:
Bobby Lashley (c) vs. Drew McIntyre

It is, of course, amazing that this is going to be their first show in front of fans in more than a year. But it can be a double-edged sword, particularly with this match.

I think Drew McIntyre has built up a lot of good will over the past year, as he’s had to be Raw‘s top babyface during a one-in-a-century pandemic. And then of course, there’s the fact that last year he had to have his big Wrestlemania win over Brock Lesnar in front of an empty building. That said, they need to be careful with him here. Despite allegedly being a heel, Lashley has a lot of fan support these days. If they push McIntyre too hard, there’ll be a John Cena/Roman Reigns effect, and the fans will turn on him.

Sadly, I don’t have the confidence in WWE to do right by either McIntyre or Lashley in this instance. I say McIntyre once again walks out of Wrestlemania as WWE Champion. This time, it’ll at least be in front of fans.

PREDICTION: Drew McIntyre

Email Rob at primaryignition@yahoo.com, or check us out on Twitter.

Posted in Wrestling

Peyton Royce: “My Potential Haunts Me.”

By Rob Siebert
Fanboy Wonder

Peyton Royce cut one of those promos Monday night on Raw Talk. You know those promos, right?  The ones where a wrestler blurs the lines between fantasy and reality, talks about how they aren’t used to their full potential, etc. CM Punk really popularized this kind of thing 10 years ago with his famous “pipe bomb” promo on Raw.

While this kind of promo has almost become routine over the last decade, I can’t hate on somebody for putting a voice to their passion. That’s what was really on display here from Peyton Royce. It wasn’t the best promo from an execution standpoint. But I’d still rather see this on Raw than some of the scripted garbage we’re fed on a weekly basis.

A couple things that stood out to me…

“Why not just let me go? Let me go and see what happens?” In hindsight, she should have been careful about her wording. It sounds like she’s asking to be fired. That’s a route you could take, I suppose. But it wasn’t what she was trying to say.

“Why not me? Why does it always have to be the same old, same old?” This is me projecting on to Peyton, but when she said that the person I thought of was Charlotte Flair. Is that fair to Charlotte? No. She’s extremely talented and has earned her spot in that company. But fair or unfair, they push her to the moon. And inevitably, that sometimes comes at the expense of other talents.

“My potential haunts me.” That should have been the thesis for the whole promo. The whole tirade could have revolved around Peyton Royce needing an opportunity at Asuka and the Raw Women’s Championship so she could finally quiet her mind.

I had no idea Asuka was injured. If she really is hurt, why not do a Fatal Four-Way to crown a new champion? Maybe…Charlotte vs. Peyton vs. Rhea Ripley vs. Alexa Bliss? And who knows? Maybe Peyton Royce wins.

Email Rob at primaryignition@yahoo.com, or check us out on Twitter.

Posted in Wrestling

Let’s Make Raw Talk Part of Raw

By Rob Siebert
Fanboy Wonder

So I pulled up YouTube this morning, and quickly found this little gem in my cue: Sheamus on Raw Talk after winning last night’s big gauntlet match.

Pay attention to how natural he sounds. Notice how it comes off more like an athlete being interviewed on the sidelines of a game than a scripted, heavily produced WWE promo…

This comes mere days after Cesaro cut the promo of his life (Which is to say, not a great promo. But a very good one.) on the Smackdown equivalent, Talking Smack. Shortly after the first of the year, Mustafa Ali also made some headlines on the Raw Talk by mouthing off about “Legends Night” (shown below).

The best mic work on WWE television is happening on the Raw and Smackdown post-shows, rather than on the shows themselves. What kind of backwards crap is that?

For almost a decade now, WWE has continuously struggled with finding ways to keep Raw interesting for three hours. Or at least break up the monotony of things.

Here’s my pitch: Nobody watches these post-shows anyway. They’re catching these promos online after the fact. So let’s give them a bigger audience.

WWE loves their talk show segments. “Miz TV,” “the VIP Lounge,” etc. So let’s give Charly Caruso and R-Truth a weekly segment at roughly the halfway point of Raw. Call it “Raw Talk.” Call it “Chattin’ With Charly.” Call it whatever you want. But make it the equivalent of the NFL halftime report for Monday Night Raw.

And most importantly? Every week, pick a wrestler you want to spotlight, and give them a few minutes of unscripted mic time. Nothing too extensive. Just a few minutes to let their hair down and speak freely. The result? Interesting television, as we’re allowed to get to know these individuals and their characters on a different level.

Am I wasting my keystrokes? Of course. WWE has been content to revel in their own mediocrity for years now.

But as ratings continue to plummet, ask yourself: What’s the drawback to an idea like this? What do they have to lose?

Email Rob at primaryignition@yahoo.com, or check us out on Twitter.

Posted in Wrestling

Nia Jax’s Butthole Wins the Internet

By Rob Siebert
Fanboy Wonder

So Nia Jax took bump on her tailbone this week on Raw, and a few seconds later shouted “My hole!” The camera picked it up, and the internet has been ablaze with talk about it ever since. It’s been the subject of so many jokes and memes that even the wrestlers themselves are making light of it.

This is wrestling in 2021, folks. The most interesting thing on Monday Night Raw was Nia Jax screaming about her butthole. And they wonder why more people aren’t watching…

Though for what it’s worth, the match in question between Nia Jax and Lana has gotten over a million YouTube views. But of course, WWE has bleeped Nia’s now infamous exclamation. (Jump to 2:16 at the vid below.)

Email Rob at primaryignition@yahoo.com, or check us out on Twitter.

Posted in Wrestling

WWE’s 10 Most Fascinating People 2020

By Rob Siebert
Fanboy Wonder

Who exactly are the “10 Most Fascinating People” in a given year? Every year when I do this list, I typically let the word fascinating speak for itself. But for 2020, a year like no other, let’s go ahead and expand on it.

Every week, these performers compete for our attention. Not just with opposing programming, but with each other. Everyone wants to be part of the story that’s the most dramatic, emotional, intriguing, inspiring, etc.

The list of WWE’s most fascinating people is a list of WWE wrestlers and personalities who, in my opinion, had the most interesting stories in a given year. They can be the culmination of a lifelong journey, as Drew McIntyre achieved this year. They can spark pressing questions, such as whether this is really the end for the Undertaker. One can even wind up on this list for the wrong reason, like Otis did with the Money in the Bank briefcase.

To put it simply: These are WWE’s most fascinating people of 2020, and these are their stories.

1. Drew McIntyre
In 2020, Drew McIntyre lived up to his old nickname and became WWE’s “chosen one,” winning the WWE Championship from Brock Lesnar.

Unfortunately, it happened at just about the worst possible time.

The COVID-19 pandemic was in its early days when Wrestlemania XXXVI took place, and the world was still coming to grips with the new rules we were (and still are) all living under. WWE was holding its televised events, including Wrestlemania, inside the Performance Center in Orlando with no fans in attendance. Thus, Drew essentially had his crowning moment in a vacuum. One might even call him “the Pandemic Champion.”

But to his credit, he forged ahead. He played the stalwart babyface we all needed to see during such trying times. He was an optimistic, hopeful babyface champion hungry to prove himself against all challengers. Mere moments after beating Lesnar, McIntyre would beat back a challenge from the Big Show. He would go on to successfully defend against Seth Rollins, Bobby Lashley, Dolph Ziggler, and Bobby Roode. He also retained twice over Randy Orton before dropping the belt to him at Hell in a Cell. Then on November 16, McIntyre would make Orton’s reign a short one, taking back the title in the main event of Raw.

Whether or not McIntyre is remembered as the champion of the “pandemic era” remains to be seen. But either way, one thing is certain: He’s been a champion we can be proud of.

2. Otis
Even if you see him strictly as a comedic character, it’s tough to deny Otis had a career year. Even if it didn’t necessarily end the way he’d have hoped.

Coming into 2020, Otis’ affection for Mandy Rose made him the lovable everyman in one of, if not the most interesting story on WWE television. The tale culminated at Wrestlemania, as Otis defeated Dolph Ziggler and got to kiss the girl. It would have been a tremendous Wrestlemania moment if there’d been fans in the building…

The subsequent decision to give Otis the Money in the Bank briefcase was puzzling. He was hot coming out of Wrestlemania. But a Heavyweight Title contender? Hardly. As such, the briefcase served to weigh Otis down more than elevate him, as fans were more interested in how WWE was going to get the briefcase off of him, as opposed to how and when he’d cash in.

It all came crashing down for Otis at Hell in a Cell. He lost the briefcase to the Miz in a match where his longtime tag partner Tucker turned on him. Adding insult to injury, both Tucker and Mandy were drafted to Raw, leaving Otis on Smackdown without his arch rival or his girlfriend.

Ouch.

3. MVP
Montel Vontavius Porter was a surprise entrant in the Royal Rumble Match. Despite being eliminated in a matter of seconds, he stuck around and became an unlikely staple of Raw.

He quickly aligned himself with Bobby Lashley, guiding him in a brief quest for Drew McIntyre’s WWE Championship. While Lashley would come up short, the duo would find new allies in Shelton Benjamin, and eventually Cedric Alexander. Together, they’ve formed the hottest, and certainly the most sharply dressed, faction WWE has seen in quite some time: The Hurt Business.

MVP’s staying power is lies almost entirely with the charisma and energy he brings to promos. But he’s also remained semi-active in the ring.

4. Dominik Mysterio
To say the very least, Dominik has come a long way since we saw him as the eight-year-old subject of a child custory storyline between his father Rey Mysterio and Eddie Guerrero.

Now in his early 20s, Dominik began making appearances with his father last year, one of which saw him brutalized by Brock Lesnar. But in 2020 he established himself as a wrestler and television character by inserting himself into the feud between Rey and Seth Rollins. As a result, he was given the extremely unenviable task of having his first televised WWE match at Summerslam against Rollins. To Dominik’s eternal credit, I thought he and Rollins stole the show that night. Yes, their match had its fair share of “gaga,” including involvement by both Rey and Dominik’s mother Angie. And yes, Dominik was in good hands with Rollins. But in the end, that match told the best story that night. Much of that can be attributed to how good Dominik has become at such a young age.

Rey and Dominik were drafted to Smackdown in October, where the emphasis has been largely on Rey’s daughter Aliyah and her storyline with Murphy. Frankly, I don’t think it would hurt Dominik to spend some time apart from his father, perhaps in NXT. Though knowing how pro wrestling works, a father/son feud certainly isn’t out of the question. Especially as we move closer to Wrestlemania.

5. The Undertaker
This was the year the real-life Mark Calaway finally came out of the casket.

After his Boneyard Match with AJ Styles proved to be the unlikely show-stealer at Wrestlemania, the Undertaker went on an unprecedented media tour to promote Undertaker: The Last Ride, a documentary miniseries on the WWE Network. In the process, he pulled back the curtain on himself and the character in a way many have wanted for the better part of three decades. No one exploited the Dead Man’s new chatty demeanor more than WWE themselves, who produced numerous Undertaker-centric specials and interviews for the network. This included two lengthy interviews with Stone Cold Steve Austin.

It all culminated in a “final farewell” at Survivor Series, which marked the 30th anniversary of the character’s debut. His farewell address was short but sweet: “My time has come to let the Undertaker rest in peace.”

But as always, whether this truly is the end of the line for the Undertaker remains to be seen…

6. Roman Reigns
“The Big Dog” was absent for much of 2020 thanks to COVID-19. But when he made his return at Summerslam, he changed the entire landscape of Smackdown with both a new attitude and a new manager.

This year saw WWE give Roman Reigns the one thing they never gave to their last poster boy John Cena: A heel run. What’s more, a damn good heel run. At least thus far. Now a full-fledged Paul Heyman guy, and calling himself the “Tribal Chief,” Reigns quickly won the Universal Championship from Bray Wyatt. He went on to have two quality pay per view title matches with, of all people, Jey Uso. At Survivor Series, he once again stole the show in a champion vs. champion match with Drew McIntyre. He capped it off at TLC, retaining his title over Kevin Owens.

All the while, Reigns has been doing the best character work of his career. He projects a quiet and intimidating menace that has made him the most interest part of Smackdown for months now. Had we gotten this guy five years ago, Vince McMahon could very well have had the new mega-babyface he obviously wanted Reigns to be so badly.

7. Lana
The way things look now, I wouldn’t be at all surprised to see Lana challenging for the Raw Women’s Title at Wrestlemania.

That may be blasphemous to some. But we all know WWE loves a good unlikely underdog story. And in trying to become a wrestler, the real-life CJ Perry is in fact an underdog. By her own admission, she’s not the most talented on the roster. While athletic, wrestling doesn’t come naturally to her. She’s also been the center of a few cringe-worthy storylines, not the least of which was her recent marriage storyline with Bobby Lashley. Did we mention her real-life husband, who now goes by Miro in AEW, was let go by WWE in April?

I invite those who would question Lana’s presence on this list to watch her episode of WWE Chronicle on the network. It’s a very revealing look into CJ Perry’s past, her mindset, and how hard she’s working to become a success in professional wrestling.

8. Randy Orton
This year, Randy Orton got back to doing what Randy Orton does best: Being a merciless, despicable heel. He does it better than just about anyone in the business today. So it’s not necessarily a surprise that in doing so, he became one of the centerpieces of Raw in 2020.

Much of it was familiar. He attacked legends like Ric Flair and Shawn Michaels, delivering his signature punt to the head. There were plenty of RKOs out of nowhere. And indeed, Orton claimed yet another WWE Championship, defeating Drew McIntyre in a Hell in a Cell Match in October.

But what once again made Orton one of the most compelling villains in WWE was what he did with Edge early in the year. The night after Edge made one of the more emotional returns in recent memory, Orton met him in the ring and proposed they reform Rated RKO. It was all a trap, of course. Orton would beat down his former friend, capping it off with a brutal chair attack (What Edge used to call a one-man “Con-Chair-To.”) This sparked a feud that went into the spring, and included Orton hitting an RKO on Edge’s wife Beth Phoenix. They had a Last Man Standing Match at Wrestlemania, and followed it up with a match dubiously titled “The Greatest Wrestling Match Ever” in June. Edge would win the former, Orton the latter. A rubber match is almost undoubtedly in the works. No doubt when it does, Orton will be as formidable and dangerous as he’s ever been…

9. Bayley
In 2020, the Smackdown Women’s Division was all about Bayley, Sasha Banks, and when their inevitable implosion would happen. The powder keg finally blew in September when Bayley ambushed Banks in the ring.

So why put Bayley on the list and not Sasha? A few reasons…

Coming into 2020, the experiment of turning Bayley heel was still fairly new. What’s more, compared to Raw Women’s Champion Becky Lynch or NXT Women’s Champion Rhea Ripley, she had by far the least buzz or momentum. Both Bayley and her championship were cold.

The alliance, and eventual feud, between Bayley and Banks revitalized the Bayley character as a villain, and thus revitalized the championship around her waist. Also a factor was the sheer length of Bayley’s run with the title. At 379 days, she’s the longest reigning Smackdown Women’s Champion of all time, and one of the longest of the modern era as well.

10. Edge
There was just something about seeing him come out at the Royal Rumble.

Edge had hit a spear during the Summerslam pre-show in 2019, which caused a little buzz about a return to the ring. That buzz increased tenfold when the wrestling news sites started reporting he’d be an entrant in the 2020 Royal Rumble Match. So it’s not like we had no clue he was coming…

But when his music hit that night, it had all the magic and grandeur it deserved. The “Rated R Superstar” had defied medical science and returned to the ring after nine years. And he wasn’t stopping with the Rumble.

The following night, Edge started a program with his former tag team partner Randy Orton that would extend into the summer. The two had a Last Man Standing Match at Wrestlemania, which would receive mixed reviews at best. They followed it up with a much better match, dubiously advertised as  “The Greatest Wrestling Match Ever” at Backlash. Sadly, Edge would suffer a torn triceps in that match that would leave him on the shelf for the rest of the year. But the smart bet is he and Orton will go one more round at this year’s Wrestlemania.

Assuming he can stay healthy, the best of Edge’s return has yet to come. Sadly, the COVID-19 pandemic has largely robbed him of the chance to wrestle in front of live audiences again. He, and WWE at large, may fare better in 2021. Either way, he’s got a laundry list of big match opponents. From AJ Styles to Roman Reigns to Seth Rollins and beyond. With luck, Edge’s comeback tour has only just begun.

Email Rob at primaryignition@yahoo.com, or check us out on Twitter.

Posted in Wrestling

The Owen Hart Chronicles: The Road to Kinghood

***Everyone has seen Owen Hart’s matches with his brother Bret. But Owen had the talent, charisma, and ability to hang with anybody. That’s what we’re here to illustrate. These are “The Owen Hart Chronicles.”***

By Rob Siebert
Fanboy Wonder

Owen Hart’s star would never shine brighter than it did on June 19, 1994. That night, one year after his brother Bret had one the tournament the year before, Owen took the crown for himself.

Like Bret, Owen had to win three matches in one night to win the tournament. He took down Tatanka in the quarter-finals, and would beat Razor Ramon in the finals. But Owen’s best match that night came in the semi-finals when he faced the 1-2-3 Kid, a.k.a. the real-life Sean Waltman.

The story coming in was that Kid had scored an upset over Jeff Jarrett in the quarter-finals. Jarrett then attacked Kid, potentially taking him out of the tournament altogether. Thus, coming into this match both men were perfectly cast. Kid was the wounded underdog, and Owen was the underhanded heel determined to advance at all costs. The latter is very much evident when Owen dropkicks his opponent through the ropes before the bell even rings.

The irony here is that while the story of the match is about one of the wrestlers being injured, these two work a quicker and more dynamic pace than we were used to seeing in the WWF at the time. It’s a sprint, clocking in at 3 minutes and 37 seconds. But these two defined what it means to “maximize your minutes.”

Owen capitalizes on his early attack by hitting a top-rope splash, only for Kid to kick-out and send him into the corner, with Owen taking Bret’s trademark sternum-first bump into the buckles. Kid then hits a cross-body off the rop rope.

To their credit, in just over three minutes Hart and Waltman turned in a back-and-forth performance that made you believe the Kid had a chance, despite being hurt before the match. He hangs in there with a number of counters, martial arts kicks, a Fisherman’s Suplex, and a somersault over the top rope.

Owen is finally able to go for the kill after, of all things, a powerbomb. Specifically, a counter of an attempted head-scissor into a powerbomb. Certainly not something we saw Owen pull out regularly. But this was one of the rare occasions he was the bigger man in the match. So it works. A Sharpshooter clinches the win for Hart.

Watching this back, what I’m struck by is that even on one of the biggest nights of his career, Owen still finds himself in Bret’s shadow. I didn’t mean to reference Bret with that sternum bump. But I’ve seen Bret do it so many times it’s burned into my brain. Owen wears the pink singlet and the sunglasses, just like Bret. He of course uses Bret’s finisher, the Sharpshooter. Later, his victory speech will essentially be all about Bret.

Much of this is part of the story they were telling, of course. The idea was to set Owen up for the now classic Steel Cage Match against Bret for the WWF Championship at Summerslam. But I wonder to what extent (if any) this characterization hurt Owen’s career later on. Even as he’d win championships and continue to turn in good matches in the coming years, he’d still largely be seen as Bret’s bratty little brother.

Owen was a star in his own right. Unfortunately, you had to squint to see it. How ironic that it was Bret who got a documentary called Wrestling with Shadows. That same title can be used for much of Owen’s career.

Email Rob at primaryignition@yahoo.com, or check us out on Twitter.

Posted in Wrestling

Best of WWE Extreme Rules: A Playlist Before This Year’s “Horror Show”

By Rob Siebert
Fanboy Wonder

“It’s the one night of the year where WWE goes extreme!!!!”

What does that mean? Eh, nothing really. It’s a line they used to tack on to this Extreme Rules pay per view. In reality, it’s a show where they throw in some gimmick matches for the sake of the title. Extreme Rules is the descendant of ECW One Night Stand. So if they really wanted to make this show special, they’d stick it in a smaller venue like the Hammerstein Ballroom (shown above) to make it look like an old ECW show. Or maybe even someplace like Full Sail University, and up the ticket price accordingly to compensate for the smaller capacity.

Of course, you can’t do that now. Damn Coronavirus.

But where there is creativity and performance, there is inevitably some greatness to be found. As we build to this year’s Extreme Rules: The Horror Show show on July 19, here’s a playlist representing the best of this event over the last 11 years. Despite being WWE’s sanitized version of “extreme,” you might be surprised at the quality of what you find…

NO HOLDS BARRED MATCH:
Rey Mysterio vs. Chris Jericho
June 7, 2009
New Orleans, LA

It was on this night that Jericho won his ninth and (thus far) final Intercontinental Championship. That’s a record that stands to this day, and may in fact stand as long as the title exists.

But perhaps more importantly, this is one of the better IC Title matches of the so-called “PG Era.” We had a compelling yet simple story coming in about Jericho wanting to unmask Rey Mysterio Jr. Jim Ross and Todd Grisham were on commentary for this one, and the former did an excellent job playing up the importance of the mask to Rey. Not to mention its cultural significance. So in the end, when Jericho snatches Rey’s mask off during a 619 attempt and then rolls him up for the pin, it actually means something.

These two managed to cut a hell of a pace too. At certain points, you’d think they were still part of WCW’s renowned Cruiserweight Division. Moments before the finish, we get something we’d never see today: A chairshot to the head. Mind you, Rey “works” the shot to Jericho’s head fairly well. But a shot to the head is a shot to the head.

If this match proves anything, it’s that Jericho was and still is one of the true artists in the world of pro wrestling. Whoever elevates whomever he works with. Even if that person is already a legend like Ricky Steamboat, Shawn Michaels, or in this case, Rey Mysterio Jr.

LADDER MATCH:
Edge vs. Jeff Hardy
June 7, 2009
New Orleans, LA

I probably shouldn’t have, but I felt sorry for Edge, Jeff, and all those TLC guys for a long time.

Yes, I know those ladder matches and TLC Matches made stars out of the Hardys, the Dudleys, and Edge & Christian. But those matches would also follow all those guys around for the rest of their careers. They became synonymous with the Ladder Match to the point that so many of their big bouts had to be Ladder Matches. So when they started this program with one another, it was inevitable there’d be a Ladder Match at some point.

And this is how jaded we’d all become at that point: This match isn’t even that exciting. Yes, there are some brutal bumps. Edge takes a nasty bump between the rungs of a ladder. Later, he tries to recreate the famous mid-air spear spot from Wrestlemania. The results are mixed at best. The match is highlighted by that last visual of Edge being trapped between the ladder rungs, “crucified” as Todd Grisham puts it, as Hardy climbs up and takes the title.

This match earns its spot here because of the effort put forth by its participants. Hardly the most thrilling Ladder Match you’ll ever see. But you’ve got to take your hat off for what both these guys were willing to do to their bodies.

LADDER MATCH FOR VACANT WORLD HEAVYWEIGHT TITLE:
Alberto Del Rio vs. Christian
May 1, 2011
Tampa, FL

I don’t make a habit of going back and watching a lot of Alberto Del Rio matches. But in hindsight, he had a pretty good shtick with his personal ring announcer, the limo, the music, the big smile. If he weren’t such a sleaze bag in real life, I’d be inclined to say I miss him.

But of course, this match isn’t really about Del Rio. It’s all about Christian finally winning the big one. Would he lose it two days later at a Smackdown taping? Yes. But this is still a great moment that’s all the more relevant given how they just used him in the Edge/Randy Orton storyline.

CHICAGO STREET FIGHT:
CM Punk vs. Chris Jericho
April 29, 2012
Chicago, IL

We didn’t need the benefit of hindsight to see these two got overshadowed by the Rock and John Cena at Wrestlemania. We knew going in that it would happen. In the end, they’d once again be overshadowed at Extreme Rules by Cena and Brock Lesnar. But that doesn’t take away from the quality of the work they did. And this whole program, with a heel Chris Jericho getting personal with CM Punk about his father’s alcohol issues, was quality.

The fact that they were in Chicago did nothing but help them. This was less than a year after the famous Punk/Cena match at Money in the Bank. This crowd was every bit as pro-Punk as that one was. All these years later, I’d forgotten that Punk’s family was in the front row too. So when Jericho douses Punk in beer and beats the hell out of him with a kendo stick, it resonates that much more. The same can be said for when Punk finally pulls it out and retains the WWE Championship.

EXTREME RULES MATCH:
Brock Lesnar vs. John Cena
April 29, 2012
Chicago, IL

Mere moments into this match, Lesnar had Cena’s blood on him.

This match wasn’t necessarily as exciting as I remembered it. But as Brock Lesnar’s first match in eight years, it was still bigger and more important than almost anything that happened at Wrestlemania the previous month. This match was “big fight feel” defined.

In hindsight, this was structured not unlike the classic Cena and Lesnar would have at Summerslam two years later. Which is to say it was all about Cena being brutalized  by this WWE Champion turned MMA fighter, and the question of whether he could survive. Particularly under the Extreme Rules stipulation.

This match may also have one of the most hotly debated finishes in company history. Certainly in the last decade. Common sense would indicate that Brock would prevail here. Thus, they’d tell the story of Cena suffering yet another devastating loss just a month after losing to the Rock, and setting Brock up as a near invincible and monster.

Of course, they didn’t do that. They had Cena win after punching Lesnar with his old Thuganomics lock and chain, followed by an A.A. on to the steel ring steps. They didn’t even do a contested finish, i.e. “You can’t pin somebody on the steps!” It was just, “Cena wins. LOL.”

Still, it’s definitely a match worth looking back on. Arguably the best WWE match of 2012 overall.

EXTREME RULES MATCH:
Roman Reigns vs. AJ Styles
May 22, 2016
Newark, New Jersey

I’m not sure how politically correct this is to say, but AJ Styles became a made man in WWE by working with Roman Reigns.

Yes, he came in and worked with Chris Jericho. Yes, he’d go on to have some amazing matches with John Cena. But by putting Reigns over in back-to-back title matches at Payback and Extreme Rules in two great matches, Styles proved that not only was he an all-time great performer, but one that could succeed within the WWE system. These matches proved he was here to stay.

You can tell both these guys are really going for it here. Reigns had just won the WWE Championship from Triple H at Wrestlemania, and had a lot to prove to his critics. Meanwhile, I suspect Styles knew what a big opportunity this was for him, and set out to over-deliver. He succeeded, taking some downright scary bumps in the process. These included a very high backdrop off one announce table through another. Styles actually over-rotated, taking what looked like a painful landing on his butt. That’s how you crack your tailbone, right there.

In the end, what they turned in here was very much a WWE style brawl, complete with a fight through the crowd and outside antics from the Usos and Gallows & Anderson. In the end, Reigns countered a Phenomenal Forearm into a spear for the victory.

30-MINUTE IRON MAN MATCH:
Dolph Ziggler vs. Seth Rollins
July 15, 2018
Pittsburgh, PA

This match was better than the Pittsburgh crowd gave it credit for. They spent a good portion of this match counting along with the clock, Royal Rumble Match style. Meanwhile, Rollins and Ziggler were putting on a clinic in there.

They gave us a little bit of everything in this one. We had the babyface Rollins gain an early lead. We had Ziggler’s heavy Drew McIntyre come in to interfere. Then we had the heel Ziggler even it out. Then we had the heel go up, forcing the babyface to fight from underneath. We go into sudden death, a la Wrestlemania XII. Then it was McIntyre once again playing a role to give Ziggler the win. So McIntyre gets over as a force to be reckoned with, and Rollins and Ziggler get over as two workhorses, with Ziggler getting the added rub of main-eventing his first pay per view.

Let’s also not lose sight of the fact that this was the first time the Intercontinental Title was defended in the main event of a pay per view since Bret and Bulldog at Summerslam in ’92. So we’re not only elevating our two wrestlers, but we’re once again elevating the Intercontinental Title.

Email Rob at primaryignition@yahoo.com, or check us out on Twitter.

Posted in Wrestling

The Owen Hart Chronicles: Dropping Gold to HBK and Stone Cold

***Everyone has seen Owen Hart’s matches with his brother Bret. But Owen had the talent, charisma, and ability to hang with anybody. That’s what we’re here to illustrate. These are “The Owen Hart Chronicles.”***

By Rob Siebert
Fanboy Wonder

You know what’s really surprising? This was not the main event of the May 26, 1997 edition of Raw.

Consider who we’ve got here. We’ve got our Tag Team Champions Owen Hart and the “British Bulldog” Davey Boy Smith, two company mainstays who’ve held the belts a long time, and also have both secondary titles.

They’re facing Shawn Michaels, one of the company’s biggest stars, who’s coming off a controversial injury. (This was when he “lost his smile.”) His tag partner is Stone Cold Steve Austin, the hottest rising star in the industry, and thus far one of its great untapped talents.

But what got the main event slot? A talking segment with the Undertaker and Paul Bearer. I love both those guys, but c’mon…

You can very much tell we’re in the era of pay-per-view quality matches being put on free TV. Given all the build-up that went into this could easily have been second from the top on an In Your House. Especially given the story of Austin and Michaels being reluctant tag team partners trying to take something from the Bret Hart and his group, the Hart Foundation.

Not surprisingly, Owen starts it out with Austin. In theory, you’d want to big deal out of Shawn’s entrance into the match, so you keep him on the sidelines at the beginning. Oddly enough, that’s not what ends up happening. Shawn’s entrance gets a tepid response. Owen, of course, is in there to start the match at a fast pace.

As is becoming a pattern here, despite being in the main event of Raw, this match isn’t necessarily about Owen specifically. Or in this case, Owen and Bulldog. The story they’re telling is about Austin and the returning Michaels teaming up to face the Hart Foundation at large. So even though the smaller story is about the Tag Team Titles, it’s Owen and Davey’s job to shine up their babyface challengers and make them look like the big heroes they are. Both men do that very well. What this essentially becomes is a glorified exhibition for Stone Cold and HBK.

Watching this match back in 2020, there’s an elephant in the room. A little more than two months after this match, Owen famously botches a piledriver at Summerslam and alters the course of Austin’s career. So there’s an added weight when those two are in the ring together. Perhaps it’s just hindsight coloring the match, but as good as they both were, to me it never seemed like those two had a lot of chemistry…

The finish to this match surprised me. Shawn superkicks Davey when the referee is distracted with Owen, allowing Austin to get the pin. I’m not sure why, but the whole thing came off very rushed and awkward. Not at all how I remembered it.

Lost in all the storyline hoopla was the fact that this match ended a roughly eight-month Tag Team Title reign for Owen and Bulldog. I don’t know that history remembers their team as much as it should. They were damn good. Certainly as good as any team you’ll see in any promotion today.

Email Rob at primaryignition@yahoo.com, or check us out on Twitter.

Posted in Wrestling

The Owen Hart Chronicles: May 6, 1996 – The Utility Player (feat. the Undertaker)

***Everyone has seen Owen Hart’s matches with his brother Bret. But Owen had the talent, charisma, and ability to hang with anybody. That’s what we’re here to illustrate. These are “The Owen Hart Chronicles.”***

By Rob Siebert
Fanboy Wonder

Why don’t we talk more about Owen Hart’s matches? Why is he primarily remembered for the work he did with his brother Bret in the early ’90s, and less the work he did with other wrestlers?

I think much of that has to do with how the WWF higher-ups viewed Owen. Obviously he worked great as a villain for Bret, and then later as Bret’s “lovable brother” in the Hart Foundation. But when he wasn’t in Bret’s orbit, I just don’t think they saw him as a top star, whether a heel or babyface. As evidence, I would cite them not going further with him in 1998, despite the Hart family being very much in the spotlight.

It seems like the WWF saw Owen as a midcard utility player. Need to plug somebody in against your champion on a go-home show for a pay per view? Owen will give ’em a good match. Need a midcard heel tag team? Put somebody with Owen. Or in this case, does one of your top babyfaces just need a solid exhibition? Owen can do that too.

Case in point, this match between Owen and the Undertaker from the May 6, 1996 edition of Raw. This may have been the only televised singles match these two ever had. You’ll see several tag matches where they’re both involved. But they rarely had a reason to wrestle one-on-one. The Dead Man was usually busy slaying giants like Yokozuna, King Kong Bundy, Mabel, etc. But I think these two could have made magic together.

The story of this match was definitively about Undertaker and Goldust, and their upcoming Casket Match at In Your House: Beware of Dog. Goldust (accompanied by Marlena) is on headset, and actually learns it’s going to be a Casket Match on the air. To his eternal credit, the real-life Dustin Runnels does some amazing character work here. They were still playing the gay card pretty heavily with the character at this time. It doesn’t necessarily age well by modern standards. Though it’s objectively hilarious when Goldust comes on to Paul Bearer.

Owen is sort of the Larry Fine of this match. Your attention is focused on Moe and Curly, i.e. Undertaker and Goldust. But if you take a moment to focus on Owen, his subtle reactions are great. Watch him when the bell rings. He slinks around the ringside area, too apprehensive to get in there with ‘Taker. Then you’ve got his selling of the “supernatural” stuff. The zombie no-sell, the big choke, etc.

Once the match really gets going, Owen works the knee. But he also takes a couple of big moves from Undertaker, including a shove over the top to the outside. The finish comes when the Dead Man reaches over the ropes to grab Owen, who’s been distracted by Goldust. In one smooth motion, Undertaker pulled ups him up and over the ropes, and into position for a Tombstone Piledriver. Owen actually gets the so-called “Super Tombstone, where ‘Taker jumps into the air and lands on his knees, as opposed to simply dropping down. I can’t imagine putting that much trust in someone. That move looks scary as hell.

Whether you’re looking at Owen, Undertaker, Goldust, or even Paul Bearer, there’s greatness to be found in this match. You have to look a little harder to see some of it. But it’s definitely there.

Email Rob at primaryignition@yahoo.com, or check us out on Twitter.