Tag Archives: Panels of Awesomeness

Panels of Awesomeness: Justice League: No Justice #1

By Rob Siebert
Fanboy Wonder

CREATORS: Scott Snyder (Author), Joshua Williamson (Author), James Tynion IV (Author), Francis Manapil (Artist), Hi-Fi (Colors)

THE SCENE: In a battle between Brainiac and the Justice League, Superman lands a high-impact blow. But Brainiac’s motivations aren’t what the Man of Steel thinks they are.

WHY THEY’RE AWESOME: One thing I’ve always remembered about Superman Returns is the critique about its action sequences. Specifically, the notion that we needed to see Superman punch somebody. I don’t necessarily agree with that. However,¬† it is always satisfying when Big Blue hits a big blow on a big bad. Case in point, this moment with Brainiac.

What makes these two pages truly awesome the layout. Francis Manapul makes the punch as giant and epic as it deserves to be, complete with a heroic one-liner and Superman’s fist coming straight up at us. But then you’ve got the figures overlapping just a bit with the panels on the opposite page. More often than not, that trick makes for a really fun visual.

I also really like the sequential storytelling here. On the previous page we see Brainiac on top of his ship, with the rest of the League wrapped up in those tentacles. Then we get the punch, and in the next two panels we follow them off the ship and through that building. And based on how that lower middle panel is framed, we can see what kind of distance they’ve covered in relation to the ship.

Finally, that lower right panel gives us a really nice pull into the next page. Not only do you have that defiant line from Brainiac, but he’s blocking another punch. Thus indicating the momentum is about to shift.

Justice League: No Justice wraps up today with issue #4. As I’ve said previously, this is the first Justice League story I’ve picked up in a couple of years. Very curious to see where this goes.

Email Rob at PrimaryIgnition@yahoo.com, or follow Primary Ignition on Twitter.

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Panels of Awesomeness: Her Infernal Descent #1

By Rob Siebert
Fanboy Wonder

CREATORS: Lonnie Nadler and Zac Thompson (Authors), Kyle Charles (Artist), Dee Cunniffe (Colorist), Ryan Ferrier (Letterer)

THE SCENE: A middle-aged woman continues to mourn the loss of her family before quite literally taking a journey into hell.

WHY THEY’RE AWESOME: In storytelling of any nature, much is made of the narrative “hook,” i.e. what the author uses in the opening moments of the story to draw their audience into the story.

Her Infernal Descent¬†is a modern re-telling of Dante’s Inferno. Desperately longing to see her dead family again, our main character Lynn is approached by the spirit of William Blake. Despite the risk, she descends into hell with him and begins her journey through its nine circles.

But before any of that happens, we spend a handful of pages with Lynn at home (shown at right). They’re absolutely heartbreaking. It’s all so excruciatingly realistic. Look at some of the backgrounds. The kitchen is an absolute wreck. There are dirty dishes in the sink as she eats a casserole out of the dish. All the boxes from packing up. The cluttered on the floor. The empty wine glasses. Dee Cunniffe’s colors are so beautifully muted. Even when Lynn sees the sun, there’s a bleakness to it. Note the details Kyle Charles gives us with her body language. Look at Lynn’s face. Look at her posture. The unkempt hair.

But what pushed these three pages over the edge for me was the script. I’m not sure how Lonnie Nadler and Zac Thompson broke down the writing duties. But these lines punch you right in the gut because they’re so relatable. The ones that really got me were the ones about the silence in the house:

“…the first thing I noticed was the quiet. I thought I could handle it. But I can’t. I wake up and there’s nothing. I’ve hardly said a darn word to anyone since. When I was with them, they drove me up a wall. Now I’d do anything to feel that again.”

I mean, holy crap…

From there we go into a two-page spread. It’s Lynn climbing up into the attic. There are so many memories up there, and she’s flooded with them. I wont’ show it to you here, because I want you to see the issue for yourself.

Her Infernal Descent #1 is published by AfterShock, and hit comic shops April 18. It’s also available on Comixology. The next issue is solicited for release on May 23.

Email Rob at PrimaryIgnition@yahoo.com, or follow Primary Ignition on Twitter.

Panels of Awesomeness: Babyteeth #2

By Rob Siebert
Fanboy Wonder

CREATORS: Donny Cates (Author), Garry Brown (Penciller/Inker), Mark Englert (Colorist), Taylor Esposito (Letterer)

THE SCENE: A secret organization called the Silhouette realizes that a new antichrist has been born. One of its members, this old dude whose name we don’t know, insists the group take action to kill the infant. Something they’ve apparently done multiple times before.

WHY IT’S AWESOME: Firstly, Babyteeth is a damn good series. At least as far as I’ve seen. I’ve made it to issue #3. Check it out.

What sold me on this panel was the line work on this guy’s face. Garry Brown isn’t exactly going for photorealism in his work, But the age he puts into this character is extremely believable. You’ve also got the shadowing effect, Brown and Englert actually blend quite nicely with the age lines. It makes it seem like he’s a creature of darkness himself. And considering he’s talking about killing a baby, that’s not exactly far-fetched.

Email Rob at PrimaryIgnition@yahoo.com, or follow Primary Ignition on Twitter.

Panels of Awesomeness: Astonishing X-Men #8

By Rob Siebert
Fanboy Wonder

We’ve got kind of a weird one here, considering just how friggin’ long it is. Perhaps that’s not ideal for the inaugural edition of “Panels of Awesomeness.” But I couldn’t resist.

CREATORS: Charles Soule (Author), Matteo Buffagni (Penciller/Inker), Giada Marchisio (Colorist), Clayton Cowles (Letterer)

THE SCENE: Supervillain Proteus is somehow trying to bring the Astral Plane to reality. In doing so, he’s traveled to Scotland and is conjuring up images for a crowd. Images which then become reality.

WHY IT’S AWESOME: It’s all in the way Buffagni draws the little girl. The pose she’s in doesn’t seem like it would be natural. But it is. Little kids do strange things with their hands, I suppose. It’s somewhat evocative of prayer, which is kind of fitting.

I can also appreciate what he’s done with her face. There’s a hopefulness to it, but it’s not overly emphasized. The girl wants what she wants, but she doesn’t know for sure that she’s going to get it.

The way Soule phonetically writes the Scottish accent is also mildly amusing. Do people with accents like that sort of thing? Is it offensive?

Email Rob at PrimaryIgnition@yahoo.com, or follow Primary Ignition on Twitter.