Tag Archives: Movies

“The Skywalker Saga”: Can We Please Shut Up About It?

By Rob Siebert
Fanboy Wonder

I was one of the millions that saw the trailer for Ghostbusters: Afterlife yesterday. For the uninitiated, this one is different from the 2016 film, in that it’s actually a sequel to the first two movies. The ones with Bill Murray, Sigourney Weaver, etc. The trailer hits you right in the feels. Especially you’ve got a special place in your heart for this story and these characters.

Another story with a special place in my heart? Star Wars. I’m doing my best to go into The Rise of Skywalker with my expectations tempered. But it’s tough, as they’re trying to pull you into the theater by your heartstrings. The footage of Carrie Fisher. Mark Hamill’s voiceover. Rey and Kylo Ren facing off one last time. C-3PO taking “one last look at my friends.” And the proclamation that, once and for all, “The saga will end”…

Pffft. Yeah, okay.

The movie itself actually looks pretty good. Given J.J. Abrams’ involvement, I think we all have reason to be hopeful. But all this “end of the Skywalker Saga” stuff grates on me.

They don’t mean the end of Star Wars, of course. They mean the end of this nine-part story that’s mainly about the Skywalker family. The tragedy of Darth Vader. Luke and Leia’s rebellion against the Empire. And finally, Leia and Han’s son Ben, and his role in the rise of the First Order. Supposedly, we’ve got other Star Wars movies coming down the pipeline. What they’re about is anybody’s guess.

But let me tell you a little something about this “Skywalker Saga,” a term they’ve only just started using in the promotion of this film.

It’s only the end until the next beginning.

See, the Skywalker Saga has actually already ended. Twice. The first time was way back in 1983, in a little movie called Return of the Jedi. Anakin Skywalker was redeemed by his son Luke, and ultimately died in the process. Also, the Rebel Alliance blew up yet another Death Star, leading to the fall of the Empire. Sure feels like an ending to me. Pretty cut and dry.

Only then, they decided to make the prequels. And in 2005, Revenge of the Sith closed the loop between Episode I and Episode XI. We now had six movies chronicling the rise and fall of Darth Vader. Honest to God, if I had a nickel for every ad I saw that said, “The circle is now complete.” But in any event, George Lucas’ magnum opus in space was finally finished!

Until he sold it to Disney in 2012, and they said, “But wait! There’s more!” Three movies later, and we’re at another ending.

Look, I love Star Wars, warts and all. So I’ve got no issue calling this “Skywalker Saga” out for what it is: A sleazy marketing gimmick.

Some die-hards will tell you about George Lucas giving Time a quote about there being plans for nine Star Wars movies. Three trilogies, Luke and the gang coming back in the third one, etc. He said that in 1978, two decades before he decided Star Wars was a six-film saga, and the prequels would be the last Star Wars movies. In a 2005 interview with 60 minutes, he said point blank, “There is no Episode VII.”

Until there was. As the story goes, Lucas was working on another three Star Wars movies before he opted to sell to Disney.

Don’t get me wrong. I’m happy the sequel trilogy was made, and I’m grateful Star Wars can continue on in the hands of other filmmakers. (Specifically ones that can write actual human dialogue.) But let’s not kid ourselves, folks. Call him brilliant, call him a visionary, call him a genius, call him whatever you want. But George Lucas was making it up as he went along. Just like Disney is making it up as they go along. That’s not even a bad thing, per se. I believe George had vague ideas about what might happen in a sequel trilogy. But there was no grand plan. No nine-film blueprint.

Which means, if these “non-Skywalker” films don’t work out, Disney can once again say, “But wait! There’s more!” Kylo Ren banged some chick on a Star Destroyer, and has a kid he never knew about! Ladies and gentlemen, I give you…Damian Skywalker! (Or would it be Damian Solo?) Learn all about him in Episodes X, XI, and XII!

Hey Disney? We love ya. But most of us have been through this before. We understand Star Wars movies come three to a pack. You don’t have to beat us over the head with this Skywalker Saga stuff. You’re being pretty presumptuous about the whole thing. Star Wars doesn’t need to be chained to this one messed up family that chops each other’s limbs off. But if somebody has a good idea for a next-gen “Skywalker” story down the line, why not go for it? Why write yourself into a corner?

Back on the subject of magazine interviews, Esquire recently asked Billy Dee Williams about the possibility of playing Lando Calrissian again someday. Williams replied…

[The Rise of Skywalker] is a conclusion —certainly it depends on how much money is generated. That’s when they determine where’s the conclusion. … The one thing about show business, you can resurrect anything.”

You can resurrect anything. Even a war against a space dictatorship that spans entire galaxies, and has a bunch of people in robes hitting each other with laser swords.

Smart man, that Billy Dee.

Follow Primary Ignition on Twitter, or email Rob at primaryignition@yahoo.com.

Tom Hanks as Mister Rogers: A Beautiful Day in the Neighborhood Trailer

By Rob Siebert
Fanboy Wonder

Like a lot of people, I was on a big Fred Rogers kick last year in the wake of Won’t You Be My Neighbor? I did a full-on deep dive, watching other documentaries, old interviews, I read three books on the man. I even got a Mister Rogers t-shirt for Christmas.

So as you can imagine, I was quite invested in the trailer for A Beautiful Day in the Neighborhood, which dropped today.

For me personally, it took a minute to project Fred Rogers on to Tom Hanks. I think it’s Hanks’ voice. Rogers had such a distinct pitch to his voice that it’s a big adjustment to hear someone else saying “his” words. But by the end of the vid, I’d warmed up to it. Tom Hanks is obviously a great casting choice.

Take a look for yourself…

 A Beautiful Day in the Neighborhood hits theaters November 22.

Follow Primary Ignition on Twitter, or email Rob at primaryignition@yahoo.com.

George Lucas on Star Wars: Gungans and the Vietnam War

***Think what you will about George Lucas, but in terms of Star Wars, it can all be traced back to him. That’s why I always find it so interesting to listen to him talk about it. His creative process, the reason certain decisions were made, and how these movies became pop cultural staples. This space is dedicated to just that. This is “George Lucas on Star Wars.”***

By Rob Siebert
Fanboy Wonder

The Scene: The Gungan army faces the Trade Federation’s Battle Droids on Naboo.

George Lucas Says (Via the Phantom Menace Commentary Track): “Having grown up in the shadow of the Vietnam War, the issue of a primitive society confronting technologically advanced society has fascinated me. Because that was the main event that was going on during my college years. And the fact that human determination and human spirit could overcome these vastly superior armies, I actually found to be rather inspiring. … [That’s] one of the main themes that has gone through all the Star Wars films.”

I Say: This “primatives vs. the powerful” narrative is something that dates back to some of the early drafts of the original Star Wars. Lucas has said that originally, there was a big battle between Empire and a society of wookies at the end of the movie. Obviously that was changed. But the idea re-emerged in Return of the Jedi, then again in The Phantom Menace, and Lucas finally got his big wookie battle in Revenge of the Sith.

For yours truly, Star Wars has served as a bridge into so many things, whether it’s other areas of pop culture, mythology, or in this case history. When you look at some of the circumstances of the Vietnam War and place them alongside sequence like this, it almost becomes an educational tool.

Follow Primary Ignition on Twitter, or email Rob at primaryignition@yahoo.com.

George Lucas on Star Wars: Anakin and C-3PO

***Think what you will about George Lucas, but in terms of Star Wars, it can all be traced back to him. That’s why I always find it so interesting to listen to him talk about it. His creative process, the reason certain decisions were made, and how these movies became the pop cultural staples they are. This space is dedicated to just that. This is “George Lucas on Star Wars.”***

By Rob Siebert
Fanboy Wonder

The Scene: Anakin introduces Padme to C-3PO, the protocol droid he’s building to help his mother. Moments later, Threepio meets R2-D2 for the first time.

George Lucas Says (Via the Phantom Menace Commentary Track): “Not only is Darth Vader Luke and Leia’s father, but he’s also Threepio’s father. I thought that was kind of amusing irony in all of this. And I couldn’t resist it. It gives us the opportunity for Threepio to meet Artoo for the first time, and start what will ultimately become a very long and arduous friendship of sorts.”

I Say: Like a lot of people, my initial reaction to the revelation that Anakin built C-3PO was: “Bullsh*t.” Even in a world with laser swords and slug people, it was far-fetched.

But…when you hear George explain it like this, it actually makes sense. So much of Threepio’s character is based on him trying to relate to human beings. (“Sometimes I just don’t understand human behavior!”) So there’s fantastic comedic irony in the idea that like our main hero Luke Skywalker, Threepio is also Darth Vader’s son. It even casts an interesting new light on the “He’s more machine now than man” line from Return of the Jedi.

But that’s all subtext. To the average moviegoer, this Anakin connection is just a contrivance to shoehorn Threepio into the movie. And for no real reason, as there’s not much for him to do other than be introduced to Artoo. So while I very much like what George was going for with this, I don’t know that it was worth it in the end.

Follow Primary Ignition on Twitter, or email Rob at primaryignition@yahoo.com.

Rian Johnson on The Last Jedi: Luke’s Exile

***Lots of people have lots of opinions about Star Wars: The Last Jedi. You have one. I have one. But you know whose opinion I want to hear? Rian Johnson’s. He wrote it. He directed it. Now let’s hear what he has to say about it. That’s what this space is for. This is “Rian Johnson on The Last Jedi.“***

By Rob Siebert
Fanboy Wonder

The Scene: Picking right up from the ending of The Force Awakens, Rey has arrived on the planet Ahch-To to seek out Luke Skywalker. She brings him his father’s lightsaber, the same one he lost on Bespin decades ago. Luke tosses the weapon over the cliff, refusing to help Rey.

Rian Johnson Says (Via The Last Jedi Commentary Track): “This moment of Mark [Hamill] tossing the saber, that was always just something that made a lot of sense to me … The first thing I had to do as I was writing the script was figure out, why was Luke on this island? … So he knows his friends are fighting this good fight, he knows there’s peril out there in the galaxy, and he’s exiled himself way out here and taken himself out of it. So I had to figure out why. And I knew because it was Luke Skywalker, who I grew up with as a hero, I knew the answer couldn’t be cowardice. So I knew the answer had to be something active, he couldn’t just be hiding. It had to be something positive. He thinks he’s doing the right thing.

“And that kind of led to…the notion that he’s come to the conclusion from all the given evidence that the Jedi are not helping. They’re just perpetuating this kind of cycle. They need to go away so that the light can rise from a more worthy source. So suddenly that turned his exile from something where he’s hiding and avoiding responsibility to him kind of taking the weight of the world on his shoulders and bearing this huge burden of know his friends are suffering. And because he thinks its the bigger and better thing for the galaxy, he’s choosing to not engage with it.”

I Say: The notion that they handed this series off to Johnson without a plan, or answers to certain questions, is flabbergasting to me. Supposedly, that is indeed what happened. He sat down and wrote this movie with no idea why Luke had exiled himself, who Rey’s family was, who Snoke was, or any of that. He had to create his own answers. So I can sympathize with the position he was apparently put in.

The reason he came up with for Luke’s exile was fine. I like it a lot, in fact. I can certainly appreciate that it wasn’t simply cowardice. What I, and certainly numerous others, did not appreciate was the comedic chucking of the lightsaber over the cliff. That moment between Luke and Rey at the end of The Force Awakens had so much weight to it. It was the first time we’d seen Luke since Return of the Jedi. He was shocked to see this new person who’d discovered him, and Rey was vulnerable, silently asking for his guidance. It was a cliffhanger suitable to end the movie, and one we waited two damn years to get the payoff for…

It’s not Luke’s rejection of the weapon, and thus Rey’s question, that irks me. It’s the tonality of it. Instead of having Luke toss it, why not just let it drop to his feet? It’s less heavy-handed (no pun intended), and subtly speaks to his refusal to take on the responsibility of being a hero. Instead, he just tosses the weapon away like a discarded soda can or something. To do it the way they did was almost disrespectful to The Force Awakens

Follow Primary Ignition on Twitter, or email Rob at primaryignition@yahoo.com.

10 Things You Need to Know About Bird Box

By Rob Siebert
Fanboy Wonder

My latest voiceover gig has gone live. Once again, it’s hosted by the folks over at Fandom. This time, it’s “10 Things You Need to Know About Sandra Bullock’s Bird Box.”

The post-apocalyptic thriller, which came to Netflix December 21, also features Sarah Paulson, John Malkovich, Danielle Macdonald, and Machine Gun Kelly.

Here’s the trailer…

And because now is as good a time as any for a shameless plug, I’d love for you to check out my previous gig over at Fandom, “9 Shocking Rick Grimes Moments on The Walking Dead.”

Follow Primary Ignition on Twitter, or email Rob at primaryignition@yahoo.com.

Ghostbusters 3: Here We Go Again…

By Rob Siebert
Fanboy Wonder

Dan Aykroyd made a few headlines last week when he made the following comments to Dan Rather about a proper Ghostbusters 3 with the original cast, and how a sequel to the 2016 Ghostbusters remake isn’t happening.

A few thoughts…

Did we really need confirmation that the 2016 movie wasn’t getting a sequel? My review of Paul Feig’s Ghostbusters movie is one of the few reviews I’ve done that I wish I could take back. I essentially said, “It’s not the movie I wanted. But that’s okay.” I think a lot of critics were afraid to be honest about that movie for fear of being labeled anti-woman, anti-feminist, or whatever. The movie was bad, but that had nothing to do with the performers being women. It just wasn’t funny. It absolutely screamed “sleazy, desperate cash grab.” Could it have been great? Absolutely. But it wasn’t.

It’s actually pretty funny that the Ghostbusters 3 rumor mill has started up again, even after a third Ghostbusters movie has come and gone.

As someone who loves both the original movies, I think it’s cool that they still want to try a proper sequel of sorts. It feels a little dirty to be doing it without Harold Ramis. But there are stories they can tell, and ways they can make something funny, sentimental, and ultimately worthy of what’s come before.

That being said, the fact that it’s being written doesn’t mean much. Ghostbusters 3 has been synonymous with “development hell” for nearly 30 years now. I see no reason why now should be any different.

But If we are going to make this movie, let’s not get hung up on Bill Murray this time, okay?

I love the guy as much as anyone, and he’s as responsible as anyone for the original Ghostbusters being what it is. But if they have a chance to make another good Ghostbusters movie without him, then that’s what they should do. Get one or two strong new leads, and throw them in there with Aykroyd, Ernie Hudson, Annie Potts, and whoever else fits naturally into the story. Let’s see if bustin’ can make us feel good again…

Follow Primary Ignition on Twitter, or email Rob at primaryignition@yahoo.com.