Tag Archives: Mighty Morphin Power Rangers

Astonishing Art: MMPR Cosplay by Arthur Lobato

By Rob Siebert
Fanboy Wonder

I’ve talked about nostalgic feels in this space before. Todays selections gave me the wannabe dad feels.

I stumbled across the Red Ranger piece yesterday, and traced it back to the Instagram page of Brazilian designer/illustrator Arthur Lobato. As the day went on, he followed it up with Pink and Black. Hopefully we get more in the near future.

These perfectly capture the kind of playful parent I want to be someday. Joy and fun radiate off each of them. The cartooning is also well done, and the colors really pop. The whole parent/child and Ranger/zord dynamic is really cute too.

My favorite of the three is the red one, simply because of the way the little boy is looking up at his dad. Here’s hoping I get to do a two-part Halloween costume with my kid someday…

Email Rob at PrimaryIgnition@yahoo.com, or follow Primary Ignition on Twitter.

Advertisements

Panels of Awesomeness: MMPR Anniversary Special #1

By Rob Siebert
Fanboy Wonder

CREATORS: Sina Grace (Illustrator), Eleonora Bruni (Colorist)

THE SCENE: In this 25th anniversary issue, the Ninja Steel Power Rangers meet Alpha 5, who has come to ask for help.

WHY IT’S AWESOME: Sadly, Mighty Morphin Power Rangers Anniversary Special #1 doesn’t quite measure up to some of the epic multi-story annuals that have preceded it. But it does have its moments. For instance, there’s a terrific story about Karone standing trial for her crimes as Astronema.

But in terms of nostalgic feels worthy of a 25th anniversary issue, Sina Grace’s story about Alpha 5 and the Ninja Steel Rangers takes the cake. Frankly, seeing a story where Alpha is still around is a feel-good moment in and of itself. For a long time, the belief among many fan has been that Alpha 5 was destroyed off-camera when Dark Specter captured Zordon before Power Rangers in Space. That’s a heck of a downer ending for such a beloved character.

Grace’s figure renderings are excellent, especially in the big panel at the top. He does a great job of capturing Mick’s face. What’s more, Kelson Henderson, who plays Mick, has played a variety of roles on the show over the years. So to see him standing with Alpha is very fitting for an anniversary issue.

Moving downward, I love the shot of the Rangers over Alpha’s domed head. And because they’re kids, they don’t quite grasp who they’re looking at. Preston actually calls the original Power Rangers “the dinosaur ones.” Notwithstanding, of course, that they’re been a few dinosaur teams at this point…

And then you’ve got the lower left panel of the two characters running from something. There’s a lot of energy here, between the way Mick and Alpha are posed, and what Grace does with the background. To cap it off, we’ve got the ridiculous outfit Alpha is in. It’s utterly nonsensical, but charmingly silly in that Power Rangers sort of way.

Question: Is BOOM! Studios about to lose the publishing rights to Power Rangers now that Hasbro owns the franchise? As many of us know, Hasbro already licenses Transformers, G.I. Joe, and numerous other IPs to IDW. That’d be a raw deal for BOOM, as they’ve really put PR on the map in terms of the comic book industry. Some of the stories they’ve given us these last few years have been simply priceless.

Email Rob at PrimaryIgnition@yahoo.com, or follow Primary Ignition on Twitter.

Micro-Reviews: Justice League, Batman, The Man of Steel

By Rob Siebert
Editor, Fanboy Wonder

Not a good week for publisher diversity at the Siebert house. Four from DC and one from BOOM! Studios. To be fair, funds were tight this week. Otherwise this list would have been at least twice as long. But minuscule as it looks compared to previous weeks, this is what’s in my stack.

Justice League #1
Notwithstanding my prior gripes with Scott Snyder’s stuff, I enjoyed Justice League #1. As he almost always does, Snyder goes big. That’s how it should be with the League. They’re going with the classic Justice League vs. Legion of Doom story, which is always a good draw.

I wasn’t a huge fan of Metal, but one thing I did enjoy was Snyder’s world-building. He continues that here. The way he uses the Hall of Justice and the Source Wall are fun. But I’m partial to the Psychic Conference Room myself.

Batman: Prelude to the Wedding – Nightwing vs. Hush #1
I was expecting a very personal, street-level fight from this one. We got that. But there was a cosmic element that I didn’t expect. Some interesting stuff. I just didn’t expect to see it here.

Also, there’s an exchange between Bruce and Dick in this issue that rubs me the wrong way. Dick tells Bruce that when he broke off on his own, he didn’t mean to distance himself personally. I call BS on that. The friction there was part of Dick’s development as a character.

This may sound odd, but I didn’t realize it was Batman and Catwoman that were getting married as opposed to Bruce Wayne and Selina Kyle. From a secret identity standpoint, not having Bruce marry Selina makes sense. She’s a publicly known criminal. But then what’s the point? How is it even a wedding? Are Batman and Catwoman getting a marriage license? Is the state going to recognize them as married? How does that work?

Batman #48
Is it possible to make the Joker too Jokey? Or maybe to quippy? Tom King pushes it in that respect with Batman #48. The whole issue is basically a big, nonsensical talking scene. You can get away with that to an extent, because it’s the Joker. But it got to be grating. On the plus side, Mikel Janin’s art is great as always. The visual of someone as evil as the Joker in a church is disturbingly awesome. Or awesomely disturbing.

The Man of Steel #2
I’m worried that Bendis’ use of “Bendis Banter” will wear on me as his run progresses. But for now it’s charming. Superman and Green Lantern have a refreshing exchange in this issue that feels like a genuine conversation between friends. On the flip side, we see Perry White confide in Clark about the pressures of surviving in the journalism industry. As a former journalist, that’s really interesting to see.

The pencilling in this issue is split between Evan “Doc” Shaner and Steve Rude, with two pages also done by Jason Fabok. It’s all great. But Rude steals the issue as far as I’m concerned.

Go Go Power Rangers #10
The Megazord we see on the cover is called the Gravezord. It’s made from the remnants of destroyed zords, specifically the Thunderzords. Kind of like Typhonis in MMPR: Pink. Dan Mora’s awesome art aside, I can’t decide how I feel about it.

For yours truly, the highlight of this issue is Jason having to ask Zordon to do something very personal for him, and Zordon having to tell him why he can’t. Well done, Ryan Parrott.

Email Rob at PrimaryIgnition@yahoo.com, or follow Primary Ignition on Twitter.

5 Ludicrous Questions with: Ryan Parrott (Go Go Power Rangers)

***In “5 Ludicrous Questions,” we ask a comic book creator five things we’re pretty sure they haven’t been asked before. I mean, probably…***

By Rob Siebert
Fanboy Wonder

Ryan Parrott has written for both the silver screen and the printed page. His movies have been shown at film festivals around the world, including the Cannes International Film Festival and the Sundance Film Festival. He’s even directed his own independent feature, Loaded. In the world of comics, we know him from Star Trek and Starfleet Academy. In August, the first issue of Parrott’s new buddy comedy series Volition will hit the stands.

But for now, Parrott has business in the Morphin Grid.

Go Go Power Rangers, one of two PR books published by BOOM! Studios, is changing the way we look at those five ordinary teens we met in the early ’90s. Whether it’s the boyfriend we never knew Kimberly had, Billy’s dilemma about accepting a prestigious internship, or an all out brawl in Rita’s palace, Parrot knows how to bring the drama. That’s more evident now than ever, as Go Go Power Rangers is a big part of BOOM’s “Shattered Grid” event comic.

Parrott was also nice enough to get ludicrous with us. So he’s is a pretty cool guy.

Let’s dive in.

1. In an alternate universe, Kimberly Hart is bitten by a radioactive salad, and becomes Salad Girl. What are Salad Girl’s super powers?

She’d be super healthy, extremely sensible, and tougher than a week-old crouton.

2. David Yost had a great little “cameo” in an issue of Go Go Power Rangers. What other comics do you think he could have a little guest spot in? Maybe we could get him a referee gig in an issue of WWE

I think he could rock an awesome Infinity Gauntlet.

3. You’re tasked with forming a cult. What kind of cult is it, and what are the rules?

I don’t think there are enough movie cults — so maybe the Cult of Die Hard. Tank tops. No shoes. And we only eat stolen Nestle Crunch bars.

4. What does Finster’s workshop smell like? I mean, logically I feel like it smells of clay. But I feel like there’s something else in there too…

Mahogany and self-loathing.

5. Which of these cartoon birds would you be most inclined to have a beer with?

A. Iago the parrot from Aladdin
B. Daffy Duck
C. Toucan Sam from the old Fruit Loops commercials.

Toucan Sam… and the commercials aren’t THAT old.

Email Rob at PrimaryIgnition@yahoo.com, or follow Primary Ignition on Twitter.

Weekly Comic Haul: May 16, 2018: Batman, Flavor, “Shattered Grid”

By Rob Siebert
Fanboy Wonder

I’m Rob, and these are the comics I spent my hard-earned money on this week…

Flavor #1
I picked this one up for the sake of sheer curiosity. Flavor was advertised as The Hunger Games mixed with world-building akin to that of Hayao Miyazaki. Based purely on how it looks, I might throw Hell’s Kitchen in there as well. I mentioned this to Mrs. Primary Ignition, who doesn’t read a lot of comics. She promptly exclaimed, “That sounds amazing!” If it’s got her sold, it’s at least worth a look.

Batman #47
I’m not big on Batman using guns. It feels like a cheap trick to me. Or “cheap heat,” as they’d say in the wrestling world. “The Gift” introduced us to such a Batman. In an alternate timeline, of course.  But I’m nonetheless enjoying the story. It’s a tremendous spotlight for Booster Gold, who’s been a favorite of mine for a long time.

Dead Hand #2
Kyle Higgins had a double-header this week. The next chapter of “Shattered Grid” (more on that in a moment), and this baby. Dead Hand #1 surprised many a reader with a twist on its final page, leading us into this sophomore issue. This noir spy thriller is packed with plenty of intrigue, which is based a little more in reality than one might think.

Mighty Morphin Power Rangers #27
Higgins’ second outing of the week. I’m not big on the way “Shattered Grid” is prominently framed like a multiverse story, as opposed to a time-travel one. But it’s nonetheless amazing to see all these Rangers from all these eras getting to meet one another. I can certainly appreciate the use of Lauren Shiba from Power Rangers Samurai. She was about as underutilized as any Ranger in the show’s 25-year history.

A Walk Through Hell #1
I’ve been diving into the AfterShock Comics library in recent months. Babyteeth, Her Infernal Descent, Animosity, Black-Eyed Kids, etc. So I picked this one up for that reason above all else. I know very little about what to expect here, which is probably what they’re counting on. I know its about FBI agents investigating a mall shooting. That’s about it…

Justice League: No Justice #2
Someone needed to clarify this for me the other day: These four cooky teams aren’t staying together full time. They’re just here for this miniseries, and then the new Justice League book launches next month. That’s a little bit of a disappointment, as we’ve got some really interesting combinations here. Either way, No Justice has me picking up a Justice League book for the first time in a few years.

Gideon Falls #3
I wasn’t sure if I was going to stick with Gideon Falls after issue #1. But I found myself drawn back to it as the weeks went by. I’m grateful for that, as the characters have only gotten more interesting. Jeff Lemire, Andrea Sorrentino, and the Gideon Falls team have given us something irresistibly haunting.

Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles #72
This book has had its share of flaws. But it’s still one of the best TMNT runs ever. Dave Watcher’s art has a nice gritty texture to it. And Ronda Pattison’s colors are gorgeous as always. The Toad Baron character is a lot of fun too.

Email Rob at PrimaryIgnition@yahoo.com, or follow Primary Ignition on Twitter.

Panels of Awesomeness: Go Go Power Rangers #9

By Rob Siebert
Fanboy Wonder

CREATORS: Ryan Parrott (Author), Dan Mora (Penciller/Inker) Raul Angulo (Colorist), Ed Dukeshire (Letterer)

THE SCENE: The Power Rangers morph into action to take on Goldar and the Putty Patrol.

WHY THEY’RE AWESOME: Go Go Power Rangers is always near the top of my stack. That’s due in large part to the work of Dan Mora and Raul Angulo. I don’t even know if we deserve a team of artists as good as they are…

To wit, I’ve pulled two selections from this week’s Go Go Power Rangers #9. The first is the  five-way shot you see above. I like the concept of this one more than the actual execution. The center point for the gutters is in between the eyes. Thus, the way the image is framed you get a lot more of Zack and Billy than you do the others. Jason is almost boxed out. But it’s still a neat way to play with the page layout and spice up the morphing sequence.

The second is a close-up shot of the Red Ranger and Goldar in battle. Firstly, Mora’s take on Goldar has been spectacular from the get-go. He emphasizes the character’s simian side without making him look like a big hulking gorilla. I love the emphasis on the fangs. Goldar always looks much more agile when Mora draws him. That approach makes sense, as he’s supposed to be a warrior.

(Also, don’t skip on the level of detail Mora puts into the Red Ranger helmet, including Goldar’s reflection in the visor.)

This issue is tied into the big “Shattered Grid” crossover. That story has no shortage of life and death stakes. But Ryan Parrott nonetheless takes time to inject levity into the proceedings. He pokes a little fun at the standard Power Rangers “monster attack” formula in this issue. This panel gives us the most notable instance, not to mention the funniest. Of course, it’s a reference to the cliche that the “definition of insanity is doing the same thing over and over again and expecting a different result.” Keep in mind how many times we saw Goldar and the putties attack the Rangers over the years.

If you’re picking up this issue (and you should), look for MMPR‘s resident school teacher Miss Appleby early on. Parrott gives her a couple of funny lines.

Go Go Power Rangers #9 is out now from BOOM! Studios. It’s also available online via Comixology.

Email Rob at PrimaryIgnition@yahoo.com, or follow Primary Ignition on Twitter.

Epic Covers: Mighty Morphin Power Rangers #26

By Rob Siebert
Fanboy Wonder

ARTIST: Jamal Campbell

THE ISSUE: Part 2 of the “Shattered Grid” story arc, celebrating 25 years of Power Rangers. The cover harkens back to the finale of issue #25. Kimberly holds the body of Tommy Oliver, who has just been murdered by his evil doppleganger, Lord Drakkon. Meanwhile Jen Scotts, the Pink Time Force Ranger, has just arrived in their timeline.

WHY IT’S EPIC: While this cover is pretty awesome on its own merits, it’s really only epic if you’re a Power Rangers geek like me. Tommy and Kimberly are both characters from the original version of the show, which hit the airwaves in 1993. Jen, however, is a character from the show’s 2001 incarnation, Power Rangers Time Force. While we’ve seen different Rangers from different seasons cross paths before (see “Forever Red,” “Once a Ranger,” “Legendary Battle,” etc), this interaction promises more depth, and much more personal stakes.

Jen’s pose is very Power Rangers-esque, with the smoke added for effect. The different shades and intensities of pink really catch the eye. The way Tommy and Kim are positioned feels very natural, which isn’t always the case when you talk about these “grieving” poses. This one is somewhat evocative of the famous image from A Death in the Family of Batman cradling Jason Todd’s dead body. But MMPR #26 does enough to stand on its own in that regard.

Campbell has done the majority of the covers for this series. They’re all very good. But this one has a special place among the bunch.

Email Rob at PrimaryIgnition@yahoo.com, or follow Primary Ignition on Twitter.