Rob Watches Star Trek: Bros in Space

***What happens when I, a 30-something-year-old fanboy, decide to look at the Star Trek franchise for the first time with an open heart? You get “Rob Watches Star Trek.”***

SERIES: Star Trek

EPISODE: S2.E1 “Amok Time”
STARRING: William Shatner, Leonard Nimoy, DeForest Kelley
GUEST-STARRING: Celia Lovsky, Ariene Martel

WRITER: Theodore Sturgeon
DIRECTOR: Joseph Pevney
ORIGINAL AIR DATE: September 15, 1967
SYNOPSIS: Spock returns to his home planet along with Kirk and Bones for a wedding ritual, which ultimately takes a violent twist.

By Rob Siebert
Fanboy Wonder

At the risk of gilding the lily, this episode further reinforces the point I made last week about Spock not being a lifeless robot with no concept of human emotion. Because he damn sure gets his emo on in “Amok Time.”

Come to think of it, maybe Spock’s “Vulcan cut” is simply an early version of an emo haircut. Or later, I suppose. This does takes place in the future.

Here’s one of the brilliant things about the original Star Trek series, at least in my book: It’s a bromance. It’s emotional core is the unlikely friendship between Kirk and Spock. It’s certainly at the core of the season two premiere, “Amok Time.”

But what about Spock and Bones? There’s an argument to be made, at least in my book, that the dynamic between those two is actually more interesting than that of Spock and Kirk.

Think back to the opening scene of “Where No Man Has Gone Before.” As Kirk and Spock play space chess, it’s they’re having fun.  Kirk seems to find Spock’s attempt at emotional detachment endearing. As if he knows Spock can’t ever fully detach from his feelings, and the Vulcan’s efforts are obviously in vain. He doesn’t say anything, however. As it’s not his place to tell someone how to live. Kirk respects Spock, both as a first officer and a comrade.

I’m not sure if it was an unintentional byproduct of how DeForest Kelley played the role, or if the scripts really were written with this in mind. But during season one (or at least the episodes I’ve seen from season one), Bones didn’t seem to fully trust Spock. Whether he was making cracks about his Vulcan blood, or being subtly cautious about potential connections to the Romulans, it seemed like something was always hanging in the air between those two.

I don’t know that Bones flat out disliked Spock. But have you ever been in a new workplace, and come across that one coworker you have to “earn it” with? The person who’s a little apprehensive about this new face, and wants to make sure you’ll contribute to the work being done? To me, that’s Bones. Although based on what we saw in “The Menagerie,” Spock has been on the Enterprise a lot longer than he has…

So I actually found it touching when, in choosing close friends to accompany him to this “pon farr” ceremony, Spock chooses not only Kirk, but Bones. Spock asking and Bones accepting speaks to a mutual respect, and dare I say a budding friendship between the two. And of course, it’s ultimately Bones’ ingenuity that allows both Kirk and Spock to survive their battle.

The whole “groomsmen” angle touched a personal chord with me too. Ever see, or perhaps been a part of, a wedding where the groom struggles to find groomsmen? That was me in my wedding. I was fortunate enough to stand up there with three fine gentlemen, as well as my brother. But I had to put myself out there to get them. Spock did that here. I can tell you from experience that’s not an easy thing to do.

Email Rob at primaryignition@yahoo.com, or check us out on Twitter.

Rob Watches Star Trek: Glory, Thy Name is Gorn

***What happens when I, a 30-something-year-old fanboy, decide to look at the Star Trek franchise for the first time with an open heart? You get “Rob Watches Star Trek.”***

SERIES: Star Trek
EPISODE: S1.E18 “Arena”
STARRING: William Shatner, Leonard Nimoy, DeForest Kelley, James Doohan, Nichelle Nichols
WRITERS: Fredric Brown (Story), Gene L. Coon (Teleplay)
DIRECTOR: Joseph Pevney
ORIGINAL AIR DATE: January 19, 1967
SYNOPSIS: Captain Kirk is trapped in a fight for his life against a reptilian creature called a Gorn.

By Rob Siebert
Trekkie-in-Training

I picked a disconcerting point in history to be watching Star Trek for the first time. One of the things that’s so great about this show is it’s tackling of cultural and ethical questions, issues of violence and nonviolence, etc.

Star Trek looks at humanity’s future with a hopeful eye. Kirk, Spock, and the others are by nature very pacifistic. And as we saw a few weeks ago, they’ve long since outgrown issues of race like the ones we see on the news nowadays. In “Arena,” Kirk and another creature called a Gorn are placed in a fight-to-the-death conflict resolution scenario. A powerful alien force deems both races uncivilized. Thus they’re placed in a violent situation befitting such a demeanor. Of course, in the end Kirk proves them wrong. About humans at least. So Star Trek predicts humanity will ultimately rise above its more violent tendencies. Cooler heads will prevail. Logic and compassion will win the day.

Keep in mind, this episode aired in 1967. More than 50 years later, are we any closer to being like Kirk? No. Not really. Certainly not if you take to heart all this COVID craziness, and then the fallout from George Floyd’s death…
Oye. Talk about a sobering train of thought.

Keep in mind, this episode aired in 1967. More than 50 years later, are we any closer to being like Kirk? No. Not really. Certainly not if you take to heart all this COVID craziness, and then the fallout from George Floyd’s death…

Oye. Talk about a sobering train of thought.

MEANWHILE, ON JANUARY 19, 1967: Major Bernard F. Fisher of the United States Air Force becomes the first to win the Air Force Medal of Honor. The prior year, Fisher had landed his plane in South Vietnam to prevent a fellow soldier from being captured by North Vietnamese forces.

Not so sobering? The goddamn Gorn!!!! I absolutely love this friggin’ thing. Not since “The Cage” have I seen Star Trek really embrace that campy, ’60s sci-fi glory. It’s not hard to see why that whole sequence with Kirk and the Gorn is so fondly regarded.

Here’s my question: Would it have been better to just have the Gorn be nude, as opposed to putting it in that weird loin-cloth thing? I understand it’s supposed to be a ship captain. But going with the “its okay for animals to be naked” logic works for characters like Chewbacca. Why can’t it work for the Gorn? (Although I’m guessing far less thought was put into the Gorn.)

Apparently our latest Earth-like planet isn’t the only one in the universe that looks like the deserts of Los Angeles County. Apparently Star Trek shot in this area so much that a prominent rock formation has been affectionately named “Kirk’s Rock.”

Frankly, it deserves that distinction for this episode alone. Are you gonna tell me that entertainment gets any better than this? I don’t think so.

Email Rob at primaryignition@yahoo.com, or check us out on Twitter.

Rob Watches Star Trek: War and Peace

***What happens when I, a 30-something-year-old fanboy, decide to look at the Star Trek franchise for the first time with an open heart? You get “Rob Watches Star Trek.”***

SERIES: Star Trek
EPISODE:
S1.21, “Return of the Archons”
STARRING: William Shatner, Leonard Nimoy, DeForest Kelley, James Doohan, George Takei
GUEST-STARRING: Charles Macaulay, Harry Townes, Torin Thatcher
WRITERS: Gene Roddenberry (Story), Boris Sobelman (Teleplay)
DIRECTOR: Joseph Pevney
ORIGINAL AIR DATES: February 6, 1967
SYNOPSIS: The Enterprise discovers a planet on which all beings have been “absorbed” into the mind of a single ruler: Landru.

By Rob Siebert
Fanboy Wonder

What are the odds that an episode where Kirk, Spock, Bones, and Sulu get to dress up in 19th century outfits is actually about free will and humanity’s propensity for war?

Actually, on this show the odds are quite good.

Unfortunately, this is an episode where you have to work a little harder to get past the initial silliness. At first I thought we might have been introducing a new villain in Landru. Maybe a character that keeps trying to create hive mind societies based on “simpler times.” In theory, that’d be a great way to save money by recycling costumes from other productions. You could have Kirk and Spock in Victorian times, the Stone Age, or even the present (the ’60s). Frankly I’m surprised they didn’t go all out for this episode and have them just be cowboys.

Yet strangely this odd world they find themselves on isn’t Earth. Rather, an “Earth-like planet.” Pfft. Yeah, okay…

What we have is a story about a planet where individual minds have been absorbed into a single consciousness, otherwise known as “the Body.” The mind allegedly belongs to a man known only as Landru. But, SPOILER ALERT: We later find out Landru is a machine. This strange place is a computer’s logical, soulless idea of what an optimal human society should be.

MEANWHILE, IN FEBRUARY 1967: Operation Junction City is initiated by US forces in Vietnam on February 22. At 82 days, and it becomes the longest airborne operation conducted by American forces since Operation Market Garden during World War II. It is also the only major airborne operation of the Vietnam War.

As he conveniently tends to do, Kirk hits the nail on the head with these lines to a pair of rebels, who are suddenly too frightened to stand against Landru:

“You said you wanted freedom. It’s time you learned that freedom is never a gift. It has to be earned.”

It kind of makes you wonder, in a depressing sort of way, what Kirk and Spock would think of the world in 2020. Racially charged riots and protests. A pandemic. A president that is…well, what he is.

Not to mention the idea of how appealing such a hive mind might be to said president if he could be in the Landru role. And how humiliating would it be to be represented by him.

But hey! This episode is the first mention of the Prime Directive! So that’s something in the positive column, right?

Email Rob at primaryignition@yahoo.com, or check us out on Twitter.