A GCPD: The Blue Wall #4 Micro-Review – Trigger Warning!!!

***This is where we keep it nice and simple. Comic book reviews in 100 words or less. Straight, concise, and to the point.***

GCPD The Blue Wall 4, cover, January 2023, Reiko MurakamiTITLE: GCPD: The Blue Wall #4
AUTHOR: John Ridley
ARTISTS:
Stefano Raffaele, Brad Anderson (Colorist), Ariana Maher (Letterer). Cover by Reiko Murakami.
RELEASED: 
January 17, 2023

By Rob Siebert
Fanboy Wonder

I’m ready to make it official: This is the best book DC is putting out right now, and it needs to be a series. John Ridley’s voice is perfect for street-level Gotham.

This issue has a trigger warning on its first page, which isn’t something you often see. I can understand it, though, for those who are triggered by characters that are blatantly, unapologetically racist. There’s also some bloody violence. Not everyone’s cup of tea, to be sure. But I say it’s worth it.

Email Rob at primaryignition@yahoo.com, or check us out on Twitter.

A GCPD: The Blue Wall #3 Micro-Review – Poignant and Powerful

***This is where we keep it nice and simple. Comic book reviews in 100 words or less. Straight, concise, and to the point.***

TITLE: GCPD: The Blue Wall #3 (of 6)
AUTHOR: John Ridley
ARTISTS:
Stefano Raffaele, Brad Anderson (Colorist), Ariana Maher (Letterer). Cover by Reiko Murakami.

RELEASED: December 20, 2022

By Rob Siebert
Fanboy Wonder

This is a really good character issue. Ridley shows us Renee Montoya’s unrelenting obsessing with catching Two-Face, and is pretty convincing in terms of the former villain’s apparently innocent intentions. Stefano Raffaele also draws a hell of a Two-Face, with a lot of rich detail on his scarred side.

But what impressed me the most about this issue was Ridley allowing us to step into the shoes of Officer Danny Ortega as he’s a victim of racism within the department. It’s poignant, it’s powerful, and it deserves to be seen.

This should be a series. No doubt about it.

Email Rob at primaryignition@yahoo.com, or check us out on Twitter.

GCPD: The Blue Wall #2 Micro-Review – Hard-Hitting

***This is where we keep it nice and simple. Comic book reviews in 100 words or less. Straight, concise, and to the point.***

GCPD The Blue Wall 2, cover, 2022, Reiko MurakamiTITLE: GCPD: The Blue Wall #2
AUTHOR: John Ridley
ARTISTS:
Stefano Raffaele, Brad Anderson (Colorist), Ariana Maher (Letterer). Cover by Reiko Murakami.

RELEASED: November 15, 2022

By Rob Siebert
Fanboy Wonder

Here’s a nominee for hard-hitting comic book quote of the week: “…racism looks the worst when it’s dressed like power.”

There’s a lot of hard-hitting stuff in here, actually. We’ve got parolees trying to stay on the straight and narrow, a police commissioner trying to overcome trauma, a “hero cop” coming to grips with freezing on the job, an officer dealing with racist colleagues…

This issue directly references something that happened with Renee Montoya back in Gotham Central. So for those of us wondering if this book is a spiritual successor to that classic series, there’s your answer.

Email Rob at primaryignition@yahoo.com, or check us out on Twitter.

Batman – One Bad Day: The Penguin #1 Micro-Review – The Underachiever

***This is where we keep it nice and simple. Comic book reviews in 100 words or less. Straight, concise, and to the point.***

TITLE: Batman – One Bad Day: The Penguin #1
AUTHOR: John Ridley
ARTISTS:
Giuseppe Camuncoli, Cam Smith, Arif Prianto (Colorist), Rob Leigh (Letterer)

RELEASED: October 18, 2022

By Rob Siebert
Fanboy Wonder

This one wasn’t quite as gripping as the Riddler or Two-Face issues. If you’re looking for something with more of a character-driven punch, I’d recommend Joker’s Asylum: Penguin #1 or Penguin: Pain and Predjudice.

Still, John Ridley is a respectable choice to take on the Penguin, as he excels at grounded, street-level stories. Camuncoli, Smith, and Prianto also turn in a respectable artistic performance. It’s not that this is a bad issue, per se. But it does underachieve compared to its predecessors.

Email Rob at primaryignition@yahoo.com, or check us out on Twitter.

A GCPD: The Blue Wall #1 Micro-Review – Gotham Central: The Next Generation?

***This is where we keep it nice and simple. Comic book reviews in 100 words or less. Straight, concise, and to the point.***

GCPD The Blue Wall 1, cover, 2022, Meiko MurakamiTITLE: GCPD: The Blue Wall #1
AUTHOR: John Ridley
ARTISTS:
Stefano Raffaele, Brad Anderson (Colorist), Ariana Maher (Letterer). Cover by Reiko Murakami.

RELEASED: October 18, 2022

By Rob Siebert
Fanboy Wonder

Is this the spiritual successor to Gotham Central that some of us have been waiting almost two decades for? Hard to say at this point. Especially since The Blue Wall is only going to be six issues.

But I must say, Gotham Central fans should be happy with this. Everything, from art to characters to story, feels very gritty and ground-level. This could easily have been the first issue to an ongoing series. Sort of a Gotham Central: The Next Generation type thing. This one is on my pull-list for sure.

Email Rob at primaryignition@yahoo.com, or check us out on Twitter.

A Black Panther #3 Micro-Review – A New Character, A New Door

***This is where we keep it nice and simple. Comic book reviews in 100 words or less. Straight, concise, and to the point.***

Black Panther 3, cover, 2022, Alex RossTITLE: Black Panther #3
AUTHOR: John Ridley, Juni Ba
ARTISTS:
Juann Cabal, Ibrahim Moustafa, Ba, German Peralta, Matt Milla (Colorist), Chris O’Halloran (Colorist), Jesus Aburtov, Joe Sabino (Letterer). Cover by Alex Ross.

RELEASED: January 26, 2022

By Rob Siebert
Fanboy Wonder

Wait, the X-Men live on Mars now? And Black Panther and Storm are back together? I’m so confused…

Our two back-up stories (celebrating the 200th overall issue of Black Panther since 1977) are the real treat in this issue. Juni Ba brings us a tale about T’Challa in her quirky, animated style. Then, Ridley introduces us to a new character who may serve as a door to something that’s ultimately much more interesting than the story he’s telling us about Wakandan sleeper agents, assassins, etc.

Email Rob at primaryignition@yahoo.com, or check us out on Twitter.

A Black Panther #1 Micro-Review – Hitting the Ground Running

***This is where we keep it nice and simple. Comic book reviews in 100 words or less. Straight, concise, and to the point.***

Black Panther 1, cover, 2021, Alex RossTITLE: Black Panther #1
AUTHOR: John Ridley
ARTISTS: Juann Cabal, Federico Blee (Colorist), Joe Sabino (Letterer). Cover by Alex Ross.

RELEASED: November 24, 2021

A strong first outing that’s largely about change. We’ve got T’Challa adjusting to Wakanda’s switch to a parliamentary government and his new (?) role as leader of the Avengers. John Ridley hits the ground running.

When Marvel or DC put out a new series for one of their pillar characters, I typically judge it based on how accessible it is to new readers. To that end, Black Panther #1 works pretty well. Even as someone who doesn’t read T’Challa’s adventures on a regular basis, I just might stick around for this one…

Email Rob at primaryignition@yahoo.com, or check us out on Twitter.

A Detective Comics #1037 Micro-Review – Secret Identity Blown?!?

***This is where we keep it nice and simple. Comic book reviews in 100 words or less. Straight, concise, and to the point.***

By Rob Siebert
Fanboy Wonder

Detective Comics 1037, Lee Bermejo variant cover, 2021TITLE: Detective Comics #1037
AUTHORS: Mariko Tamaki, John Ridley
ARTISTS: Victor Bogdanovic, Karl Mostert, Dustin Nguyen, Jonathan Glapion (Co-Inker), Jordie Bellaire (Colorist), John Kalisz (Colorist), Aditya Bidikar (Letterer), Rob Leigh (Letterer), Tom Napolitano. Variant cover by Lee Bermejo.
RELEASED: June 8, 2021

There’s a weird error in this issue. Mr. Worth, a new villain, is hunting Bruce Wayne. He asks aloud, “Where are you, Wayne?” Batman then pops out and says, “Here!” Kind of gives away the whole secret identity thing, doesn’t it?

John Ridley and Dustin Nguyen do a back-up story this time around. As far as I’m concerned, both of them are always welcome in Batman’s world. Naturally, it serves as a precursor to The Next Batman.

Email Rob at primaryignition@yahoo.com, or check us out on Twitter.

Weekly Comic 100s: The Next Batman: Second Son #4

***This is where we keep it nice and simple. Comic book reviews in 100 words or less. Straight, concise, and to the point.***

By Rob Siebert
Fanboy Wonder

TITLE: The Next Batman: Second Son #4
AUTHOR: John Ridley
ARTISTS: Travel Foreman, Mark Morales & John Livesay (Inkers), Rex Lokus (Colorist), Deron Bennett (Letterer). Cover by Doug Braithwaite.
RELEASED: March 16, 2021

Tim Fox’s brother Luke Fox was Batwing, the New 52 hero who was essentially supposed to be the Batman of Africa. Even though Batwing fits pretty organically into this early portion of Tim Fox’s origin story as Batman, it somehow still feels like DC is trying to shoehorn him into this book. I’ll risk speaking for the majority of comic book fans when I say: We didn’t care about Batwing then, we don’t care about Batwing now.

The Fox family drama element in this book is surprisingly compelling. It feels natural. And unlike Batwing, not shoehorned in.

Email Rob at primaryignition@yahoo.com, or check us out on Twitter.

Weekly Comic 100s: The Next Batman: Second Son #1

***This is where we keep it nice and simple. Comic book reviews in 100 words or less. Straight, concise, and to the point.***

By Rob Siebert
Fanboy Wonder

TITLE: The Next Batman: Second Son #1
AUTHOR: John Ridley
ARTISTS: Tony Akins, Ryan Benjamin (Breakdowns), Mark Morales (Inker), Rex Lokus (Colorist), Deron Bennett (Letterer). Cover by Doug Braithwaite.
RELEASED: February 23, 2021

Here’s something unexpected: We get Tim Fox in this issue, but not Batman. Meaning we see our lead character in action, but never in his superhero costume. That’s odd, but also kind of refreshing.

Tim is on a covert mission in Vietnam here, so he’s dressed in basic black attire. The story doesn’t call for the Batsuit. So we don’t get the Batsuit. This being a first issue, one might consider that a drawback. But I credit John Ridley for not illogically adding the costume to a sequence that didn’t call for it.

Email Rob at primaryignition@yahoo.com, or check us out on Twitter.