Astonishing Art: Han and Leia’s Wedding by Geneva Bowers

By Rob Siebert
Fanboy Wonder

This weekend I finally started Star Wars: The Princess and the Scoundrel by Beth Revis. The book tells a story which, among various other things, contains Han Solo and Princess Leia’s wedding following the events of Return of the Jedi. I’ve been looking forward to this one. It caps off one hell of a summer for Star Wars books, that’s for sure.

Several days ago, Entertainment Weekly dropped this fun little piece of business. An artistic rendering of Han and Leia’s wedding on Endor, courtesy of Geneva Bowers. It’s got a great storybook quality to it. It wouldn’t necessarily feel out of place mixed in with the Star Wars Little Golden Books my daughter enjoys so much.

I wish Star Wars would do this kind of thing with their books more often. The franchise is so visual in nature, and it makes all the sense in the world. And while we’re at it, more Geneva Bowers Star Wars projects, please and thank you.

Geneva Bowers, Star Wars the Princess and the Scoundrel

Email Rob at primaryignition@yahoo.com, or check us out on Twitter.

George Lucas on Star Wars: Lando Calrissian

***Think what you will about George Lucas, but in terms of Star Wars, it can all be traced back to him. That’s why I always find it so interesting to listen to him talk about it. His creative process, the reason certain decisions were made, and how these movies became the pop cultural staples they are. This space is dedicated to just that. This is “George Lucas on Star Wars.”***

***New around here? Check out Primary Ignition‘s “George Lucas on Star Warsarchive!***

By Rob Siebert
Fanboy Wonder

Lando Calrissian, Star Wars The Empire Strikes Back

The Scene: Lando Calrissian, Han Solo’s old friend and administrator of Cloud City on Bespin, enters the film.

George Lucas Says (via the Empire Strikes Back commentary track): Lando Calrissian was created as a character who was a foil to Han, who represents what Han was before he met Luke and Leia in Episode IV. … [Lando] is sort of making the same mistakes that Han would make if Han hadn’t joined the Rebellion and become a little bit more compassionate. He’s the more out for himself kind of character, who has to do what’s practical to keep his life in order. And now Han is trapped in a world between those two. He’s not quite as compassionate and caring as Luke and Leia are. But he’s moved away from where he was, which is where Lando Calrissian is now.”

I Say: I like the idea of someone who’s on an emotional journey meeting someone who’s back at the beginning of a similar journey. It can make for interesting storytelling. That is indeed what we get with Han and Lando in Empire. But I also love that Lando isn’t simply a Han Solo clone. They were able to create character with its own unique vibe and texture. And in the process, Lando became almost as ionic, if not every bit as much, as Han.

Email Rob at primaryignition@yahoo.com, or check us out on Twitter.

George Lucas on Star Wars: Who Shot First?

***Think what you will about George Lucas, but in terms of Star Wars, it can all be traced back to him. That’s why I always find it so interesting to listen to him talk about it. His creative process, the reason certain decisions were made, and how these movies became the pop cultural staples they are. This space is dedicated to just that. This is “George Lucas on Star Wars.”***

***New around here? Check out Primary Ignition‘s “George Lucas on Star Warsarchive!***

By Rob Siebert
Fanboy Wonder

Han Solo, Greedo, Star Wars A New Hope

The Scene: The bounty hunter Greedo confronts Han Solo over money he owes Jabba the Hutt. The two sit at a table.

In the original version of the film, Han shoots Greedo dead under the table.

In all versions following the 1997 Special Edition release, Greedo shoots at Han first and misses, prompting Han to fire back and kill him.

George Lucas Says: “It was always meant that Greedo fired first, and in the [original release] you don’t get that too well. And then there was a discussion about, “Well it’s good that it’s left amorphous and everything.” … In terms of Han’s character and everything, I didn’t like the fact that when he was introduced the first thing he did is just gun somebody down in cold blood. That wasn’t what was meant to be there.”

I Say: Like a lot of (Dare I say most?) Star Wars fans, I’m a “Han shot first” guy, and call BS on the idea that Greedo shot and missed at point blank range. If Greedo was supposed to fire his gun first, then why have the two of them sitting at a table? The notion that Greedo, or anybody, could miss a shot like that is laughable.

What’s more, I’d argue Han gunning someone down in cold blood fits perfectly with what George describes as his character arc. He’s talked at length over the years about how Han Solo starts out very selfish, cold, and out for himself. But through his relationship with Luke and Leia, he gradually starts to become compassionate and care about others. As this is Han at the beginning of that arc, it’s more than fitting for him to kill Greedo to save his own skin.

Email Rob at primaryignition@yahoo.com, or check us out on Twitter.

A Star Wars: Han Solo & Chewbacca #5 Micro-Review – Consistent Quality

***This is where we keep it nice and simple. Comic book reviews in 100 words or less. Straight, concise, and to the point.***

star_wars_han_solo_and_chewbacca_5_cover_2022_phil_notoTITLE: Star Wars: Han Solo & Chewbacca #5
AUTHOR: Marc Guggenheim
ARTISTS:
David Messina, Alex Sinclair (Colorist), Joe Caramagna (Letterer). Cover by Phil Noto.
RELEASED:
August 10, 2022

By Rob Siebert
Fanboy Wonder

This isn’t the strongest issue to come out of this series. But five issues in, Guggenheim, Messina, and this team have sold me on their ability to produce a quality monthly title about Han and Chewie. That’s saying something, considering how underwhelmed I was at the beginning.

The friendship between Han and Chewie is the understated emotional core to this book. It’s a buddy action comedy. And that’s how it should be, really.

On the downside, we get a gratuitous appearance from a couple of familiar Mos Eisley Cantina characters. Lame.

Email Rob at primaryignition@yahoo.com, or check us out on Twitter.

A Star Wars: Han Solo & Chewbacca #4 Micro-Review – Chewbacca vs. Krrsantan

***This is where we keep it nice and simple. Comic book reviews in 100 words or less. Straight, concise, and to the point.***

Star Wars Han Solo and Chewbacca 4, cover, 2022, Phil NotoTITLE: Star Wars: Han Solo & Chewbacca #4
AUTHOR: Marc Guggenheim
ARTISTS:
David Messina, Alex Sinclair (Colorist), Joe Caramagna (Letterer). Cover by Phil Noto.

RELEASE DATE: July 20, 2022

By Rob Siebert
Fanboy Wonder

Several pages of this issue are pretty cool, as they’re just Chewbacca and Krrsantan shooting at one another and speaking wookiee. So in it’s own way its almost a silent portion of the issue. And to an extent, Chewie gets to save the day early on. I get the sense George Lucas would approve.

For obvious reasons, David Messina’s art makes me think of Krrsantan’s appearances in The Book of Boba Fett. Based on a few panels in this issue, I’ve got to think he used those episodes for reference. It’s all in the eyes, man. All in the eyes…

Email Rob at primaryignition@yahoo.com, or check us out on Twitter.

George Lucas on Star Wars: Han Solo, the Cynical Foil

***Think what you will about George Lucas, but in terms of Star Wars, it can all be traced back to him. That’s why I always find it so interesting to listen to him talk about it. His creative process, the reason certain decisions were made, and how these movies became the pop cultural staples they are. This space is dedicated to just that. This is “George Lucas on Star Wars.”***

By Rob Siebert
Fanboy Wonder

Han Solo, Mos Eisley Cantina, Star Wars Episode IV A New Hope

The Scene: Luke Skywalker and Obi-Wan Kenobi meet Han Solo, a smuggler they hope will take them to Alderaan.

George Lucas Says (via the A New Hope commentary track): “Han Solo is the foil to the idealistic Luke. He’s the cynical mercenary and Luke is the idealist, the dreamer, the one who is trying to do things to make it a better world. Han Solo is somebody who’s been beaten down by the world and really only cares about himself. Luke symbolizes the compassionate hero. … And obviously in the course of the movie, Han Solo’s character arc is that he goes from being a self-centered, selfish, cynical character to a caring, compassionate, try-to-make-this-a-better-place type character. It’s a fun part. It’s a fun character. Good stories usually involve two people who are the opposite of each other, and that’s a principle aspect of the story is how those characters beat up against each other.”

I Say: Is Han Solo the best cynical foil in movie history? If not, he’s got to be in the top two or three. He’s definitely the most iconic. And it is a fun part. So much fun, in fact, that the series almost feels like it’s missing a key ingredient without the character.

Email Rob at primaryignition@yahoo.com, or check us out on Twitter.

A Star Wars: Han Solo & Chewbacca #3 Micro-Review – Our Hero’s Daddy Issues

***This is where we keep it nice and simple. Comic book reviews in 100 words or less. Straight, concise, and to the point.***

TITLE: Star Wars: Han Solo & Chewbacca #3
AUTHOR: Marc Guggenheim
ARTISTS:
David Messina, Alex Sinclair (Colorist), Joe Caramagna (Letterer). Cover by Phil Noto.

RELEASED: June 29, 2022

By Rob Siebert
Fanboy Wonder

This issue ends with an appearance from a Marvel character that recently made their live action debut on The Book of Boba Fett. I’m definitely hooked for issue #4.

Han Solo & Chewbacca has rebounded nicely after what I thought was an underwhelming first issue. Guggenheim has Han nailed from a depiction perspective. They’ve even managed to get me into the question “The Crystal Run” poses about Han’s father…

Because of course Han Solo has daddy issues. Star Wars is about that as much as anything else, isn’t it?

Email Rob at primaryignition@yahoo.com, or check us out on Twitter.

George Lucas on Star Wars: Boba Fett’s “Death”

***Think what you will about George Lucas, but in terms of Star Wars, it can all be traced back to him. That’s why I always find it so interesting to listen to him talk about it. His creative process, the reason certain decisions were made, and how these movies became the pop cultural staples they are. This space is dedicated to just that. This is “George Lucas on Star Wars.”***

By Rob Siebert
Fanboy Wonder

Boba Fett, Return of the Jedi

The Scene: Han Solo accidentally smacks Boba Fett’s jet pack with a weapon, jump-starting his jet pack and sending him falling into the sarlaac pit below, presumably to his demise.

George Lucas Says (via the Return of the Jedi commentary track): “In the case of Boba Fett’s death, had I known he was going to turn into such a popular character I probably would have made it a little more exciting. Boba Fett was just another one of the minions. Another one of the bounty hunters and bad guys. But he became such a favorite … for having such a small part, he had a very large presence. And now that his history has been told in the [prequel] trilogy, it makes it even more of a misstep that we wouldn’t make more out of the event of his defeat. Because most people don’t believe he died anyway. I had contemplated putting that extra shot in where he climbs out of the hole. But I figured it doesn’t quite fit. The main character that ultimately dies in this scene is Jabba the Hutt.”

I Say: “It’s a little refreshing to hear George admit a mistake here. He’s a guy that usually sticks to his guns. But with almost 40 years of hindsight, it’s pretty tough to deny that Fett went out like a chump. Years after the fact, Lucas would make a similar admission about his decision to kill off Darth Maul in The Phantom Menace.

It’s even more interesting that George acknowledges that the fans didn’t buy that as his death. It makes you wonder if he’d have made Fett part of the sequel trilogy, had he gone forward with his version of the movies.

Fett was, of course, brought back for various novels and comic books in the old “Legends” canon. And now, Disney has made his return official with The Mandalorian and The Book of Boba Fett. So I guess he didn’t go out like a chump after all…

Email Rob at primaryignition@yahoo.com, or check us out on Twitter.

A Star Wars: Han Solo & Chewbacca #2 Micro-Review – Shared History

***This is where we keep it nice and simple. Comic book reviews in 100 words or less. Straight, concise, and to the point.***

Star Wars Han Solo and Chewbacca 2, cover, 2022, Phil NotoTITLE: Star Wars: Han Solo & Chewbacca #2
AUTHOR: Marc Guggenheim
ARTISTS:
David Messina, Alex Sinclair (Colorist), Joe Caramagna (Letterer). Cover by Phil Noto.

RELEASED: May 18, 2022

By Rob Siebert
Fanboy Wonder

This issue opens with a scene that might have been in the Solo movie: Han as a child, talking to his dad on the Corellian shipyards. We get the line about how father makes ships, but one day son will fly them…

For better or worse, every little nuance of the Star Wars movies is something to be explored. Case in point, in the original movie it was evident that Han and Greedo knew each other. This story dives into their shared history. Not a bad issue. Definitely an improvement from the first.

Email Rob at primaryignition@yahoo.com, or check us out on Twitter.

A Star Wars: Han Solo & Chewbacca #1 Micro-Review – Mostly Missable

***This is where we keep it nice and simple. Comic book reviews in 100 words or less. Straight, concise, and to the point.***

Star Wars Han Solo and Chewbacca 1, cover, 2022, Alex MaleevTITLE: Star Wars: Han Solo & Chewbacca #1
AUTHOR: Marc Guggenheim
ARTISTS:
David Messina, Alex Sinclair (Colorist), Joe Caramagna (Letterer). Cover by Alex Maleev.

RELEASED: March 9, 2022

By Rob Siebert
Fanboy Wonder

Naturally, there’s a lot of potential in a series about Han and Chewie. This first issue didn’t quite live up to that potential, though. It’s perfectly missable.

Though I will say, there’s an intriguing cliffhanger for next issue. So perhaps it’s just a slow starter…

The best part of the presentation by far is the cover by Alex Maleev. It reminds me of some of the covers you used to see for Star Wars novels in the ’90s.

Email Rob at primaryignition@yahoo.com, or check us out on Twitter.