A GCPD: The Blue Wall #6 Micro-Review – Series, Please!

***This is where we keep it nice and simple. Comic book reviews in 100 words or less. Straight, concise, and to the point.***

GCPD The Blue Wall 6, cover, March 2023, Reiko MurakamiTITLE: GCPD: The Blue Wall #6
AUTHOR: John Ridley
ARTISTS: Stefano Raffaele, Brad Anderson (Colorist), Ariana Maher (Letterer). Cover by Reiko Murakami.
RELEASED: March 21, 2023

By Rob Siebert
Fanboy Wonder

The last page, more specifically the last panel, of this issue comes off a little hokey. But all in all, a perfectly serviceable and satisfying ending.

I maintain that, especially at a time when they’re doing this Dawn of DC initiative, GCPD: The Blue Wall should be a series. Something like this is tailor-made for John Ridley’s voice. This is the spiritual successor to Gotham Central that some of us have been waiting decades for.

Email Rob at primaryignition@yahoo.com, or check us out on Twitter.

A GCPD: The Blue Wall #5 Micro-Review – Real-World, Dark, Personal Realities

***This is where we keep it nice and simple. Comic book reviews in 100 words or less. Straight, concise, and to the point.***

GCPD The Bllue Wall 5, cover, February 2023, Reiko MurakamiTITLE: GCPD: The Blue Wall #5
AUTHOR: John Ridley
ARTISTS:
Stefano Raffaele, Brad Anderson (Colorist), Josh Reed (Letterer). Cover by Reiko Murakami.
RELEASED: 
February 21, 2023

By Rob Siebert
Fanboy Wonder

I’ve made a point to call GCPD: The Blue Wall a spiritual successor to what Gotham Central was 20 years ago. But it’s important to note that while The Blue Wall is similar to Gotham Central in many ways, this book also does do its own thing.

Gotham Central was much more about what it’s like to be a cop in Gotham, a city with superheroes, supervillains, etc. The Blue Wall seems to focus more on the real-world, dark, and personal realities of being a police officer, in a story that just happens to be set in Gotham City.

Email Rob at primaryignition@yahoo.com, or check us out on Twitter.

A GCPD: The Blue Wall #4 Micro-Review – Trigger Warning!!!

***This is where we keep it nice and simple. Comic book reviews in 100 words or less. Straight, concise, and to the point.***

GCPD The Blue Wall 4, cover, January 2023, Reiko MurakamiTITLE: GCPD: The Blue Wall #4
AUTHOR: John Ridley
ARTISTS:
Stefano Raffaele, Brad Anderson (Colorist), Ariana Maher (Letterer). Cover by Reiko Murakami.
RELEASED: 
January 17, 2023

By Rob Siebert
Fanboy Wonder

I’m ready to make it official: This is the best book DC is putting out right now, and it needs to be a series. John Ridley’s voice is perfect for street-level Gotham.

This issue has a trigger warning on its first page, which isn’t something you often see. I can understand it, though, for those who are triggered by characters that are blatantly, unapologetically racist. There’s also some bloody violence. Not everyone’s cup of tea, to be sure. But I say it’s worth it.

Email Rob at primaryignition@yahoo.com, or check us out on Twitter.

A GCPD: The Blue Wall #3 Micro-Review – Poignant and Powerful

***This is where we keep it nice and simple. Comic book reviews in 100 words or less. Straight, concise, and to the point.***

TITLE: GCPD: The Blue Wall #3 (of 6)
AUTHOR: John Ridley
ARTISTS:
Stefano Raffaele, Brad Anderson (Colorist), Ariana Maher (Letterer). Cover by Reiko Murakami.

RELEASED: December 20, 2022

By Rob Siebert
Fanboy Wonder

This is a really good character issue. Ridley shows us Renee Montoya’s unrelenting obsessing with catching Two-Face, and is pretty convincing in terms of the former villain’s apparently innocent intentions. Stefano Raffaele also draws a hell of a Two-Face, with a lot of rich detail on his scarred side.

But what impressed me the most about this issue was Ridley allowing us to step into the shoes of Officer Danny Ortega as he’s a victim of racism within the department. It’s poignant, it’s powerful, and it deserves to be seen.

This should be a series. No doubt about it.

Email Rob at primaryignition@yahoo.com, or check us out on Twitter.

GCPD: The Blue Wall #2 Micro-Review – Hard-Hitting

***This is where we keep it nice and simple. Comic book reviews in 100 words or less. Straight, concise, and to the point.***

GCPD The Blue Wall 2, cover, 2022, Reiko MurakamiTITLE: GCPD: The Blue Wall #2
AUTHOR: John Ridley
ARTISTS:
Stefano Raffaele, Brad Anderson (Colorist), Ariana Maher (Letterer). Cover by Reiko Murakami.

RELEASED: November 15, 2022

By Rob Siebert
Fanboy Wonder

Here’s a nominee for hard-hitting comic book quote of the week: “…racism looks the worst when it’s dressed like power.”

There’s a lot of hard-hitting stuff in here, actually. We’ve got parolees trying to stay on the straight and narrow, a police commissioner trying to overcome trauma, a “hero cop” coming to grips with freezing on the job, an officer dealing with racist colleagues…

This issue directly references something that happened with Renee Montoya back in Gotham Central. So for those of us wondering if this book is a spiritual successor to that classic series, there’s your answer.

Email Rob at primaryignition@yahoo.com, or check us out on Twitter.

A Detective Comics #43 Review – A Contrast in Batmen

Detective Comics #43TITLE: Detective Comics #43
AUTHOR: Brian Buccellato
PENCILLER: Fernando Blanco. Cover by Francis Manapul.
PUBLISHER:
DC Comics
PRICE: $3.99
RELEASED: August 5, 2015

By Rob Siebert
Editor, Fanboy Wonder

Between Jim Gordon becoming the new Batman, the upped emphasis on Harvey Bullock and the GCPD, and the reemergence of fan-favorite character Renee Montoya, Detective Comics is starting to bear a mild resemblance to Gotham Central. You won’t hear any complaints about that from me. At. All.

We open the issue to discover the unthinkable has happened: The power core from the new robotic Batsuit has been stolen. As the GCPD rush to find it, the vicious La Morte gang continues to threaten Gotham. Plus, Renee Montoya, fresh from internal affairs, has her sights set on Harvey Bullock’s partner Nancy Yip. Given the two have become “partners” in more ways than one, this makes things personal for Bullock.

Detective Comics #43While this issue isn’t necessarily about him specifically, the most memorable element in Detective Comics #43 is the way Jim Gordon, in costume, is drawn in the opening scene. When Bullock and the others find him, he’s been ambushed by La Morte and is almost completely spent. We see him hunched over, almost as if he’s ready to vomit from sheer fatigue. Then he slides into a sitting position, and Fernando Blanco gives him an expression with traces of both relief and desperation. What makes this so interesting is that it’s such a stark contrast to how we’re used to seeing Batman. His posture is different, his expressions are different, he talks to people differently. This is a nice illustration of he contrast between Bruce Wayne’s Batman and Gordon’s Batman, without making it so obvious.

On the subject of differences, Gordon is still sporting his silly mohawk. The style choice obviously isn’t Buccallato or Blanco’s fault. I suspect that was a Greg Capullo design choice. What does fall on this team’s shoulders is in this issue, Gordon’s head appears to have a 5 o’clock shadow, in addition to the mohawk. Perhaps that’s a nitpick, but it drew my attention away from the story. If they’re trying to convey that some time has passed since Gordon first became Batman, that’s something we as readers already know. Yes, the mohawk look is dumb. But it’s the look we got, so let’s just stick with the damn thing.

Detective Comics #43, Bullock, GordonUnder pressure from Montoya (Damn, it’s good to have her back.), Bullock presents Gordon with a fairly drastic solution to the Yip problem. Like, drastic even by Bullock’s standards. It’s in character, though. For all his eccentricities Bullock has always put his police work first, even when it means crossing certain lines (Longtime fans might want to take a look back at the Officer Down story arc to see what I mean.)

In Batman, Scott Snyder and Greg Capullo seem to be telling a story about how being Batman changes Jim Gordon and those closest to him. There’s also the question of whether Bruce Wayne can live without being Batman. In contrast, Detective Comics seems to be about how a police-sanctioned Batman changes the GCPD. For Bullock and Yip, change isn’t necessarily a good thing.

Images 1 and 2 from usgamer.net.

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