Posted in Comic Books/Graphic Novels, Micro-Reviews

A Catwoman: Lonely City #2 Micro-Review – Is That You, Julie Newmar?

***This is where we keep it nice and simple. Comic book reviews in 100 words or less. Straight, concise, and to the point.***

Catwoman Lonely City 2, cover, 2021, Cliff ChiangTITLE: Catwoman: Lonely City #2
AUTHOR/ARTIST: Cliff Chiang

RELEASED: December 21, 2021

By Rob Siebert
Fanboy Wonder

For yours truly, Lonely City is proving to be more about Chiang’s art than the heist story he’s whipped up. Specifically, the way he draws Catwoman herself. There’s a great show-stealing page in this issue where he draws a very Julie Newmar, Batman ’66 looking version of her.

Also, for some reason Catwoman in a hoodie (shown above) is a look that works for me. It makes no sense, but it works.

Email Rob at primaryignition@yahoo.com, or check us out on Twitter.

Posted in Comic Books/Graphic Novels, Micro-Reviews

A Catwoman: Lonely City #1 Micro-Review – The Cat Returns

***This is where we keep it nice and simple. Comic book reviews in 100 words or less. Straight, concise, and to the point.***

By Rob Siebert
Fanboy Wonder

Catwoman Lonely City 1, cover, 2021, Cliff ChiangTITLE: Catwoman: Lonely City #1
AUTHOR & ARTIST: Cliff Chiang
RELEASED: October 19, 2021

This is basically Cliff Chiang’s attempt at giving Catwoman her own version of The Dark Knight Returns. I can’t say this is the best TDKR style “future Gotham” story I’ve read. But one great thing Lonely City has going for it is a strong noir vibe. Both in terms of the writing and the art. It’s similar to the old Darwyn Cooke/Ed Brubaker Catwoman stories.

Of course, as a Batman: The Animated Series buff, I appreciated Chiang’s use of the gray costume.

Email Rob at primaryignition@yahoo.com, or check us out on Twitter.

Posted in Comic Books/Graphic Novels, Micro-Reviews

A Batman ’89 #3 Micro-Review – What Might Have Been

***This is where we keep it nice and simple. Comic book reviews in 100 words or less. Straight, concise, and to the point.***

By Rob Siebert
Fanboy Wonder

Batman 89 3, cover, 2021, Joe QuinonesTITLE: Batman ’89 #3
AUTHORS: Sam Hamm
ARTISTS: Joe Quinones, Leonardo Ito (Colorist), Clayton Cowles (Letterer)
RELEASED: October 12, 2021

This issue starts out with a cool “What if?” scenario that looks at Harvey Dent not becoming Two-Face. We don’t necessarily see that kind of thing often. So that’s cool.

It still baffles me that they changed the Catwoman costume. I just don’t get it. I mean…why?

Apparently the Batman ’89 universe’s Robin isn’t Dick Grayson or Tim Drake, but a mechanic named Drake Winston. But he’s actually pretty likable. He’s got a good look, too. So no complaints here.

Email Rob at primaryignition@yahoo.com, or check us out on Twitter.

Posted in Uncategorized

A Batman ’89 #2 Micro-Review – Costume Complaints

***This is where we keep it nice and simple. Comic book reviews in 100 words or less. Straight, concise, and to the point.***

By Rob Siebert
Fanboy Wonder

Batman 89 2, cover, 2021, Joe QuinonesTITLE: Batman ’89 #3
AUTHOR: Sam Hamm
ARTISTS: Joe Quinones, Leonardo Ito (Colorist), Clayton Cowles (Letterer)
RELEASED: September 14, 2021

For some bizarre reason, Batman ’89 tinkers with the Michelle Pfiefer Catwoman costume. Not sure why you’d do that. That suit is every bit as iconic as the Burtonverse Batman costume.

On the subject of costumes, I’m not necessarily a fan of the direction they’ve taken the Robin suit. It’s a little too ninja for my liking.

Credit where credit is due, though: This is a fairly unique take on Harvey Dent. And he’s at the center of the story, which is right where he should be.

Email Rob at primaryignition@yahoo.com, or check us out on Twitter.

Posted in Comic Books/Graphic Novels, Deep Dive Reviews

Primary Ignition‘s Batman Deep-Dive Review Archive

The following represents our full archive of Batman Deep-Dive Reviews…

Batman
Vol. 1: I Am Gotham
Vol. 2: I Am Suicide
Vol. 3: I Am Bane
Batman/The Flash: The Button
Vol. 4: The War of Jokes and Riddles
Vol. 5: The Rules of Engagement
Vol. 6: Bride or Burglar

Vol. 7: The Wedding
Vol. 8: Cold Days
Vol. 9: The Tyrant Wing
Vol. 10: Knightmares

Vol. 11: The Fall and the Fallen

Email Rob at primaryignition@yahoo.com, or check us out on Twitter.

Posted in Comic Books/Graphic Novels

Weekly Comic 100s: Batman/Catwoman #4

***This is where we keep it nice and simple. Comic book reviews in 100 words or less. Straight, concise, and to the point.***

By Rob Siebert
Fanboy Wonder

TITLE: Batman/Catwoman #4
AUTHOR: Tom King
ARTISTS: Clay Mann, Tomeu Morey (Colorist) Clayton Cowles (Letterer)
RELEASED: March 30, 2021

There’s a gorgeous two-page spread of Catwoman in this issue, with Batman in the background. Beautiful work by Mann and Morey.

Less beautiful? The full page shot of one of Selina’s cats standing over a dead penguin (the bird, not the villain) with its throat bitten out. Seriously.

Selina is acting weird in this story, maintaining some kind of loyalty to the Joker while still in a relationship with Bruce. It doesn’t cast her in a favorable light at all, and I’m not a fan. This same dynamic with a lesser villain? Maybe. But the Joker? No.

Email Rob at primaryignition@yahoo.com, or check us out on Twitter.

Posted in Comic Books/Graphic Novels

Weekly Comic 100s: Batman/Catwoman #3

***This is where we keep it nice and simple. Comic book reviews in 100 words or less. Straight, concise, and to the point.***

By Rob Siebert
Fanboy Wonder

TITLE: Batman/Catwoman #3
AUTHOR: Tom King
ARTISTS: Clay Mann, Tomeu Morey (Colorist), Clayton Cowles (Letterer)
RELEASED: February 16, 2021

It’s Christmas time in this issue. I can only assume the pandemic delayed it, and it was supposed to come out in December.

I saw someone on Twitter describe the secret camaraderie that Catwoman and the Joker have as an “affair.” Joker makes an allusion along those lines in this issue. But it’s, y’know, a joke. Because he’s the Joker.  You could call the dynamic a lot of things. But not an affair. The word affair obviously implies sex. The Joker and Catwoman are not sleeping together.

At least they’d better not be…

Email Rob at primaryignition@yahoo.com, or check us out on Twitter.

Posted in Comic Books/Graphic Novels

Weekly Comic 100s: Batman/Catwoman #2

***This is where we keep it nice and simple. Comic book reviews in 100 words or less. Straight, concise, and to the point.***

By Rob Siebert
Fanboy Wonder

TITLE: Batman/Catwoman #2
AUTHOR: Tom King
ARTISTS: Clay Mann, Tomeu Morey (Colorist), Clayton Cowles (Letterer)
RELEASED: January 19, 2021

For yours truly, there’s still a stain on Clay Mann’s name because of Heroes in Crisis (Tom King as well, obviously). But the guy is an objectively awesome artist, and he draws a pretty awesome Phantasm, as we see here in an early splash page.

This issue touches on the trust that exists, or maybe doesn’t exist, between Bruce and Selina. It’s a path that makes sense, as Selina was a thief. I’m just not sure I’ve regained enough confidence in King to believe it’ll be told well. Not necessarily a fan of all the time jumps we’re seeing.

Email Rob at primaryignition@yahoo.com, or check us out on Twitter.

Posted in Comic Books/Graphic Novels

Weekly Comic 100s: Rorschach, Crossover, and More!

***”Weekly Comic 100s” keeps it nice and simple. Comic book reviews in 100 words or less. Straight, concise, and to the point.***

By Rob Siebert
Fanboy Wonder

We’re going to be spending the next few weeks catching up on “Weekly Comic 100s.” So you’re going to see a variety of books from late November into December. Starting with…

TITLE: Rorschach #3
AUTHOR: Tom King
ARTISTS: Jorge Fornes, Dave Stewart (Colorist), Clayton Cowles (Letterer)
RELEASED: December 15, 2020

This issue gives us an origins story for Laura Cummings, Rorchach’s apparent sidekick. To its credit, it strikes close to home, as Laura’s father leads a home-grown militia preparing for the arrival of squids, a la the one we saw at the end of Watchmen. And of course, the ones we often see on the news nowadays…

It’s a brilliant thing to pluck from modern headlines. It feels not only poignant, but something Rorschach would appreciate.

TITLE: Crossover #2
AUTHOR: Donny Cates
ARTISTS: Geoff Shaw, Dee Cunniffe (Colorist), John J. Hill (Letterer)
RELEASED: December 9, 2020

This issue was a better read for me than the last one was. I was so baffled by the inciting incident and the whole “comic characters come to life” premise that I couldn’t enjoy the issue. This time around things settle down, and we get an idea of what where the book is going.

I still can’t say I’m a huge fan of Crossing Over. Despite this issue being a little more grounded, I still have trouble wrapping my head around the premise. But I’ll say this much: I’ll be back for issue #3. For curiosity’s sake, if nothing else.

TITLE: Juggernaut #4
AUTHOR: Fabian Nicieza
ARTISTS: Ron Garney, Matt Milla (Colorist), Joe Sabino (Letterer)
RELEASED: December 9, 2020

“Sorry. I know it’s hard to breathe inside me.”

A villain says that to Juggernaut in this issue. I’ll just let that statement speak for itself, I think.

While the novelty of this series is starting to wear off a bit, I must admit Nicieza, Garney, and the Juggernaut team have a good outing with this issue. We fill the action quota, while also doing some nice character work with both Cain Marko and D-Cel, who I’m starting to warm to more and more.

TITLE: Batman/Catwoman #1
AUTHOR: Tom King
ARTISTS: Clay Mann, Tomeu Morey (Colorist), Clayton Cowles (Letterer)
RELEASED: December 1, 2020

This book jumps around to different scenes at different times quite frequently. Not my cup of tea in terms of story structure.

This book introduces Phantasm, as in Batman: Mask of the Phantasm, into the DC Universe proper. Fair enough. Though her inclusion doesn’t tip the scales one way or the other in terms of quality.

Clay Mann and Tomey Morey are on point here. The issue has a certain sensuality to it, which I suspect is by design. I just wish I could stop having Heroes in Crisis flashbacks when I see Mann’s work.

TITLE: Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles: Jennika #2
AUTHOR/ARTIST: Brahm Revel
RELEASED: December 2, 2020

This month, we learn that New York City has de-funded all the fire departments in Mutant Town until they can figure out an aid package. I’d say that doesn’t reflect too well on New Yorkers. But then I remembered: This is the universe where Baxter Stockman is the mayor. That ship may have already sailed…

I know I’m a broken record, but I can’t say enough good things about the “sketchy” aesthetic Brahm Revel brings to this book. What’s more, he gets to flex some horror muscles in this issue, which is a tribute to his versatility.

TITLE: The Other History of the DC Universe #1
AUTHOR: John Ridley
ARTISTS: Giuseppe Camuncoli (Layouts & Cover), Andrea Cucchi (Finishes), Jose Villarrubia (Colorist), Steve Wands (Letterer). Cover by Camuncoli & Marco Mastrazzo.
RELEASED: November 24, 2020

This could very well be the best Black Lightning story ever written.

The Other History of the DC Universe #1 takes you there. It brings you into the mind of Jefferson Pierce, and shows you how he feels. Not just about John Stewart strictly being a substitute Green Lantern, or the Justice League being comprised of mostly white men. It draws you into the head and heart of a man trying desperately to save the community he grew up in, and bring a little more justice into the world.

This issue is worth the $6.99. Worth every penny.

Email Rob at primaryignition@yahoo.com, or check us out on Twitter.

Posted in Television

Rob Watches Star Trek: Bones Slaps Catwoman!

***What happens when I, a 30-something-year-old fanboy, decide to look at the Star Trek franchise for the first time with an open heart? You get “Rob Watches Star Trek.”***

SERIES: Star Trek
EPISODE: S2.E11 “Friday’s Child”
STARRING: William Shatner, Leonard Nimoy, DeForest Kelley, James Doohan, Nichelle Nichols
GUEST-STARRING: Julie Newmar
WRITER: D.C. Fontana
DIRECTOR: Joseph Pevney
ORIGINAL AIR DATE: December 1, 1967
SYNOPSIS: Kirk, Spock, and Bones are caught in the middle of a tribal dispute on Capella IV, and face a moral dilemma when a woman does not want her unborn child.

By Rob Siebert
Trekkie-in-Training

As someone who grew up with the ’60s Batman show, it’s difficult in reviewing these old Star Trek episodes to not draw comparisons between the two. As they were made around the same time, they already look and sound quite similar.

It’s even more difficult when familiar faces pop up. Julie Newmar, who for a time played Catwoman, has a central role in “Friday’s Child.” It’s also shockingly physical, given her character is pregnant…

If you’re ever looking for a Star Trek episode that holds up to today’s “woke” culture about as well as a wet paper towel, it’s this one. Look no further than when Bones, in trying to examine Newmar’s character, places his hand on her pregnant belly. Eleen tells him not to “touch me in that manner.”

Bones responds with, “Now you listen to me, young woman. I’ll touch you in any way or manner that my professional judgment indicates.”

An unnerving line by today’s standards. But not so bad when you consider he threw in the bit about professional judgment. He is a doctor, after all.

Far less excusable is, after she slaps him across the face twice, Bones responds with a slap of his own to the heavily pregnant Eleen. Not a good look for the good doctor. Even if his patient is Catwoman.

Then again, maybe Bones had the right idea. Mere moments after the slap, Eleen seems to come around. She later insists that only McCoy is allowed to touch her. As the culture on this alien world is very male-dominated, maybe the slap earned Bones some form of respect from her? Or maybe you just had to be there…

Kirk later proceeds to give the whole thing a borderline rapey vibe by asking, “How’d you arrange to touch her, Bones? Give her a happy pill?”

Bones’ cringe-worthy response?  “No, a right cross.”

None of this is meant to be offensive, of course. The episode even seems to understand that the slap was a big deal. So I credit it for that, while also taking into account when this was written. But that’s not an excuse. Even with the benefit of hindsight, this is bad writing.

So how do you fix it? How do you write this scene by today’s standards? Let’s assume you have to have some version of it in there. Some scene where Bones convinces Eleen that he has to physically examine her…

It’s only a short time later that Eleen actually gives birth. As this was written by a man, I think we can safely assume he wasn’t cognizant of the excruciating pain involved in childbirth. So maybe have Bones offer to see to her, but she only accepts his offer once she’s really in pain?

Of course, they could have avoided a lot of trouble by taking out the whole “men can’t touch Eleen” part of the story. But that’s a separate issue.

Email Rob at primaryignition@yahoo.com, or check us out on Twitter.