Tag Archives: Caitlin Snow

A Justice League of America: Rebirth #1 Review – What’s Our Motivation?

Justice League of America: Rebirth #1, 2017, Ivan ReisTITLE: Justice League of America #1
AUTHOR: Steve Orlando
PENCILLER: Ivan Reis
PUBLISHER: DC Comics
PRICE: $2.99
RELEASED: February 8, 2016

By Rob Siebert
Editor, Fanboy Wonder

This book is a little confusing. Historically, when DC has put out an alternate Justice League title, the group typically has a distinct mission or commonality that separates it from the traditional League. For instance, Justice League Dark had an obvious paranormal theme. The 2012 Justice League of America book was about the team serving America’s interests.

This new Justice League of America title is either about giving people “mortal” heroes they can relate to, or giving its team members a chance at a fresh start. Maybe both. The problem is neither of those concepts are sufficiently fleshed out to the point that they make sense. So there’s not enough there to get us invested in our heroes and make us care.

After the events of Justice League vs. Suicide Squad, Batman has recruited former Squad members Killer Frost and Lobo to be part of a new incarnation of the Justice League. He also recruits Black Canary, Vixen, the Ray, and Ryan Choi (protege of the Atom, Ray Palmer). He sets the team up at the Justice League’s original base at Happy Harbor. That’s about it in terms of what this issue gives us. Granted, that’s assuming you haven’t read any of the character one-shots that have come out. But there’s no looming threat, villain, or indicator of what the plot might be going forward. We get a Geoff Johns style page at the end that previews stories to come, but it’s nothing specific. That’s not to say the first issue of every team book needs such things. But without them, this one feels flat.

Justice League of America: Rebirth #1, Killer Frost, Batman, Ivan ReisThere are a few lines in this book about the new JLA not being “gods,” which presumably means they’re not as ultra-powerful as Superman, Wonder Woman, or the Flash. I like that idea. The problem is, this team doesn’t really fit with that M.O. In Justice League vs. Suicide Squad, Batman literally blew Lobo’s head off. He proceeded to grow it back. We also saw Killer Frost use her powers to incapacitate the League’s most powerful members. I’m not very familiar with this version of the Ray, but in the past he’s been virtually invincible. As for Vixen, we’ve seen her fly like a bird, harness the speed of a cheetah, and do any number of things that humans aren’t meant to do. So if the goal is to show people heroes that are “like them,” Batman and Ryan Choi are the only ones on this team who really belong. You can add Canary to the list if you’re a little more liberal about it. But most of these characters would be more than capable of holding their own against a Superman or Wonder Woman.

Then there’s the whole second-chance/rebuild-yourself idea. I understand that approach with Lobo and Killer Frost. He’s a killer and she’s a villain. But Vixen wants more of an image rebranding than anything else.Black Canary is seemingly there just to help supervise. And why exactly do the Ray and Ryan Choi need a fresh start, anyway?

In a first issue like this, there’s nothing wrong with strictly doing team-member introductions like this. But there’s a lack of consistency here that’s frustrating. These characters are all so different, which is a good thing. But when that’s the case, you usually need a strong commonality to justify putting them together. Justice League of America: Rebirth #1 doesn’t give us that. And without an intriguing enemy or opposing force, the premise of the series falls apart before it really begins.

justice-league-of-america_-rebirth #1, group shot, Ivan ReisOn the plus side, the use of the Secret Sanctuary, i.e. the “original” Justice League base in Happy Harbor is a great use of classic DC continuity. We get a nice full-page shot of the inside, showing us it hasn’t been used in some time. Batman calls it “a remnant of a bygone era.” I find that a little funny, considering when the New 52 started, superheroes had only been around for about five or six years. With this “Rebirth” initiative, the timeline is even more vague. So exactly how long ago was this bygone era?

Ivan Reis is no stranger to the Justice League, and he’s always going to turn in quality work. He’s complimented wonderfully here by inkers Joe Prado and Oclair Albert, and colorist Marcelo Maolo. What I found particularly striking here was Reis’ rendering of Vixen. She’s very much the stunning supermodel the story calls for. But Reis also gives her a nice edge. She’s gorgeous, but also hardened. In certain panels you can see that wild, animalistic side lingering behind her eyes. Simply put, it’s one of the best takes on her I’ve ever seen.

It’s just a shame it had to be in this book. Justice League of America: Rebirth #1 needed to hook us. It didn’t. We could have a great series coming our way. But JLA now has to work that much harder to win me back. Because as of now, I have no clue why I should be shelling out money to read it.

Follow Primary Ignition on Twitter @PrimaryIgnition, or at Facebook.com/PrimaryIgnition.

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A Review of The Flash S2E2 – When Worlds Collide

By Rob Siebert
Editor, Fanboy Wonder

The Flash remains, in my humble opinion, the best superhero show to hit the airwaves in years. As we’re getting into it’s second season, it continues to be enjoyable. And this plotline involving Earth-2 has some great potential.

But, that being said, this week’s episode was underwhelming. Sadly, much of it has to do with Jay Garrick, our Flash of Earth-2.

The Flash, S2E2, Jay GarrickTeddy Sears does his first full episode as Jay Garrick. This isn’t Teddy’s first time around the block, but he was pretty wooden in this episode. He’s got a good look, but I don’t see a lot of chemistry between he and Grant Gustin or Danielle Panabaker. But of course, this is only his first episode. Let’s give him some time to get comfortable in the role. And let’s hope he gets it quickly. For obvious reasons, it’s looking like Jay is going to be a big part of this season.

Jay also needs to stop calling Barry “kid.” You’re The Flash, man. Don’t be condescending.

Six months after Ronnie Raymond’s alleged death, Caitlin appears to be crushing on Jay. Um…is six months enough time to get over the death of your husband? Mrs. Primary Ignition says no. But then again, Ronnie was gone for so long that maybe it was easier for her to get re-accustomed to life without him. I imagine that’s going to make things awkward when he comes back again…

The Flash, Season 2, Episode 2, Patty SpivotShantel VanSanten plays Patty Spivot, a cop dying to get on Joe West’s metahuman task force. Very happy to see a new love interest for Barry. Patty Spivot is also his love interest in the comics right now, if I’m not mistaken. Obviously Barry is going to end up with Iris in the end. But I’ve always found Iris to be extremely annoying. There’s nothing wrong with how Candice Patton plays the part. But to me Iris has always been written very whiny and irritating. That’s why I’ve consistently rooted for Barry to end up with Caitlin. But Patty Spivot works too. Shantel VanSanten was charming in the role. She’s a welcome addition to the cast.

Cisco tells Professor Stein about his visions, makes him promise to keep it a secret. Stein appears to have a seizure near the end of the episode. Cisco’s logic in telling Stein keep his mouth shut about thing makes no sense. He wants these awful visions to go away, but he doesn’t want Stein or anyone else to help him? From a drama standpoint, tt would have made more sense if Stein had his little episode as he and Cisco were about to confide in the rest of the team. Just my opinion.

Also, that “I get a vibe” line was nice a little wink.

The Flash, Season 2, Episode 2, Jay Garrick, Sand DemonZoom recruits Eddie Slick, a.k.a. Sand Demon, to kill The Flash. Sand Demon is one of the few comic book super villains I’m not familiar with, but Kett Turton did fine playing a bad guy. Still, I couldn’t help but see him as a poor man’s version of Marvel’s Sandman. Based on how his fight with Barry and Jay ended, I’m wondering if we’ll see him again, as we did with the various villains last season.

The episode ends with what appears to be an alternate-Earth version of Harrison Wells. So…is that the real Harrison Wells? Or is that future Eobard Thawne disguised as Harrison Wells? Also, was that Earth-2? Regardless, this could get messy.

Image 1 from designtrend.com. Image 2 from thegg.net. Image 3 from bamsmackpow.com.

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A Review of The Flash S2E1 – Excitement, Frustration, and Alternate Earths

The Flash, season 2 posterBy Rob Siebert
Editor, Fanboy Wonder

***Warning: Spoilers lay ahead for The Flash, Season 2, Episode 1***

Last season, The Flash turned out to be a very pleasant surprise. It wasn’t without its hiccups, of course. But in the end, it turned out that DC’s television universe may be more interesting than the cinematic one it’s trying to get off the ground. Grant Gustin plays a pretty good everyman, and the show proved that not all superhero shows don’t necessarily need to be grim or gritty to succeed.

Let’s hope that success can continue this season. This episode was fine, but also surprisingly frustrating…

Our season 2 premiere reveals that Ronnie Raymond apparently died while helping The Flash stop the black hole in the season 1 finale. I found this development pretty lame. We’ve already done the whole “grieving over Ronnie” thing. This feels like we’re retracing steps from last season. Granted, this is a superhero story. It’s entirely possible that Ronnie is alive and well somewhere. But then we’re just retracing our steps yet again with the whole “finding Ronnie” angle.

The Flash, Season 2, Episode 1, image 1Still, Barry Allen pushing everybody away was a natural reaction to Ronnie’s death, if not a little textbook superhero. I also love that Caitlin doesn’t blame Barry for what happened. Personally, I’ve always liked the idea of Barry and Caitlin being together much more than Barry and Iris. With them both being scientists, it makes more sense. Hell, she even forgave him for his role in her husband’s death! She obviously cares about him deeply. Why not explore this?

In his living will, Harrison Wells inexplicably confesses to the murder of Nora Allen, resulting in Henry Allen being released from prison. This a trap. It has to be. There’s no way Wells, in defeat, would simply give Barry the one thing he wants more than anything. So what’s the punchline?

Also, I call BS on the whole “I have to leave so you can be The Flash” thing. That makes no sense at all. How would it hinder Barry to have his father there to encourage him? What’s more, Henry MAKES Barry tell him it’s okay to go away after 14 years in prison. Talk about a dick move. Between this and the Ronnie Raymond thing, it feels like they’re writing around the actors’ availability. But is that even the case?

Atom Smasher, The Flash, Season 2, Episode 1Adam Copeland, a.k.a. WWE’s Edge, plays Atom Smasher. I’ve actually never seen Copeland act in any environment outside of WWE. I was pleasantly surprised. He’s quite good at it. But that’s not really a surprise, considering what a sadistic jackass he played during the last several years of his wrestling career. He’s got a really cool grizzled bad guy voice too.

Barry and the others construct a “Flash-Signal” to summon Atom Smasher for a confrontation. Cisco: “I think I saw it in a comic book somewhere.” This was an eye-roller. If you want to wink at the audience about Batman, then at least be clever.

Atom Smasher reveals a person named “Zoom” told him to kill The Flash. Obviously they’re building toward the introduction of Professor Zoom, here. I’m curious as to how they’ll do that. For non-comic book readers, Zoom was an alias of Eobard Thawne, who died last season. The line about Zoom taking Atom Smasher home was also curious. Is this home an alternate Earth, perhaps? Speaking of which…

The Flash, Season 2, Jay GarrickJay Garrick makes his on-screen debut in the closing moments of the episode. This is definitely exciting. Jay Garrick, the Flash of Earth-2, opens a lot of new doors for this season, and the series overall.

I can only assume we’ll see Barry travel to Earth-2 at some point, presumably by way of the cosmic treadmill. We have very little to go on at this point, obviously. But as a sucker for alternate Earth storylines, I’m very anxious to see what they do with Jay Garrick, and whatever Earth-2 characters pop up.

Image 1 from ign.com. Image 2 from forbes.com. Image 3 from comicbookresources.com.

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