Posted in Movies

George Lucas on Star Wars: Anakin and C-3PO

***Think what you will about George Lucas, but in terms of Star Wars, it can all be traced back to him. That’s why I always find it so interesting to listen to him talk about it. His creative process, the reason certain decisions were made, and how these movies became the pop cultural staples they are. This space is dedicated to just that. This is “George Lucas on Star Wars.”***

By Rob Siebert
Fanboy Wonder

The Scene: Anakin introduces Padme to C-3PO, the protocol droid he’s building to help his mother. Moments later, Threepio meets R2-D2 for the first time.

George Lucas Says (Via the Phantom Menace Commentary Track): “Not only is Darth Vader Luke and Leia’s father, but he’s also Threepio’s father. I thought that was kind of amusing irony in all of this. And I couldn’t resist it. It gives us the opportunity for Threepio to meet Artoo for the first time, and start what will ultimately become a very long and arduous friendship of sorts.”

I Say: Like a lot of people, my initial reaction to the revelation that Anakin built C-3PO was: “Bullsh*t.” Even in a world with laser swords and slug people, it was far-fetched.

But…when you hear George explain it like this, it actually makes sense. So much of Threepio’s character is based on him trying to relate to human beings. (“Sometimes I just don’t understand human behavior!”) So there’s fantastic comedic irony in the idea that like our main hero Luke Skywalker, Threepio is also Darth Vader’s son. It even casts an interesting new light on the “He’s more machine now than man” line from Return of the Jedi.

But that’s all subtext. To the average moviegoer, this Anakin connection is just a contrivance to shoehorn Threepio into the movie. And for no real reason, as there’s not much for him to do other than be introduced to Artoo. So while I very much like what George was going for with this, I don’t know that it was worth it in the end.

Follow Primary Ignition on Twitter, or email Rob at primaryignition@yahoo.com.

Posted in Movies

Rian Johnson on The Last Jedi: Luke, Rey, and the Force

***Lots of people have lots of opinions about Star Wars: The Last Jedi. You have one. I have one. But you know whose opinion I want to hear? Rian Johnson’s. He wrote it. He directed it. Now let’s hear what he has to say about it. That’s what this space is for. This is “Rian Johnson on The Last Jedi.“***

By Rob Siebert
Fanboy Wonder

The Scene: In an attempt to teach Rey about the Force, Luke guides her in reaching out with her feelings. He is horrified when she is drawn to the dark side.

Rian Johnson Says (Via The Last Jedi Commentary Track): “I felt like it was important, if we were going to have a couple of these topsy-turvy lessons where Luke is trying to teach her why not to be a Jedi, but why the Jedi need to end, the notion of approaching a Force lesson. What is the Force? And the notion of, especially for kids who are watching this … the Force is not a super power. It’s not just about making things float. … It’s not like a Superman thing. And the notion of trying to explain in a gentler, more spiritual way … Do a little bit of a rest on it. I thought [that] could be something that would be really good. And I think Mark is just tremendous in this scene, and I think Daisy is amazing.”

I Say: This is one of my favorite scenes in the movie. A sort of refresher course for fans new and old on what the Force is.

In watching this movie again, I realized Luke uses some of the same verbiage that Obi-Wan used in A New Hope….

Obi-Wan: “The Force is what gives a Jedi his power. It’s an energy field created by all living things. It surrounds us and penetrates us. It binds the galaxy together.”

Luke: “It’s the energy between all things. A tension. A balance that binds the universe together.”

I can only assume Rian Johnson did this intentionally. Why wouldn’t you, after all? Luke is essentially in the Obi-Wan role here.

This won’t be a popular opinion, but in terms of explaining what the Force is, I actually prefer the Last Jedi scene to the one with Obi-Wan. The use of the cinematography alongside Rey’s dialogue helps really drill it home.

Rey: “The island. Life. Death and decay, that feeds new life. Warmth. Cold. Peace. Violence.”

Luke: “And between it all?”

Rey: “Balance. An energy. A Force.”

Follow Primary Ignition on Twitter, or email Rob at primaryignition@yahoo.com.

Posted in Movies

Rian Johnson on The Last Jedi: Leia in Space

***Lots of people have lots of opinions about Star Wars: The Last Jedi. You have one. I have one. But you know whose opinion I want to hear? Rian Johnson’s. He wrote it. He directed it. Now let’s hear what he has to say about it. That’s what this space is for. This is “Rian Johnson on The Last Jedi.“***

By Rob Siebert
Fanboy Wonder

The Scene: Moments after being blown into the vacuum of space, Leia, seemingly by instinct, uses the Force to drift toward the safety of a nearby Resistance ship.

Rian Johnson Says (Via The Last Jedi Commentary Track): “This was something that Kathy Kennedy would bring up. The notion that Leia is a Skywalker as well, and she’s got that same heritage. There’s a line in [Return of the Jedi] where Luke says ‘you’ve got these powers too.’ We never see them manifest. And the notion that in a moment like this, when it seems like all is lost, and she just realizes she’s not done yet. … Almost like you hear about parents when their kids are caught under cars being able to get Hulk strength and lift them up. That’s kind of what I wanted this moment to be with her using the Force kind of for the first time in these movies to pull herself back and say, ‘No. We’re not done. This is not ending here.'”

I Say: I distinctly remember my jaw hitting the floor when that ship blew up, and seeing Leia violently jerked into the vacuum of space. Keep in mind, when The Last Jedi came out Carrie Fisher had been gone just shy of a year. So the notion of the Leia character being killed off so abruptly was jarring, to say the least.

I didn’t have as big a problem with this as other people did. But I can definitely see where the criticism comes from. There’s definitely an unintentional silliness to it. And yes, the idea that even as a Skywalker, an untrained Leia can use a Force in such a drastic way does push at the boundaries of believably. In a Star Wars movie, that’s certainly saying something.

One of the missed opportunities with this new trilogy is that we never learned why Leia didn’t become a Jedi herself. In the old expanded universe novels, now under the “Legends” banner, she more or less decided it wasn’t her path. Obviously, something like that has happened here as well. But why? We’ve never even gotten a throw-away line or a reference to it. Some closure on that would be nice at some point.

Follow Primary Ignition on Twitter, or email Rob at primaryignition@yahoo.com.

Posted in Movies

Rian Johnson on The Last Jedi: Luke’s Exile

***Lots of people have lots of opinions about Star Wars: The Last Jedi. You have one. I have one. But you know whose opinion I want to hear? Rian Johnson’s. He wrote it. He directed it. Now let’s hear what he has to say about it. That’s what this space is for. This is “Rian Johnson on The Last Jedi.“***

By Rob Siebert
Fanboy Wonder

The Scene: Picking right up from the ending of The Force Awakens, Rey has arrived on the planet Ahch-To to seek out Luke Skywalker. She brings him his father’s lightsaber, the same one he lost on Bespin decades ago. Luke tosses the weapon over the cliff, refusing to help Rey.

Rian Johnson Says (Via The Last Jedi Commentary Track): “This moment of Mark [Hamill] tossing the saber, that was always just something that made a lot of sense to me … The first thing I had to do as I was writing the script was figure out, why was Luke on this island? … So he knows his friends are fighting this good fight, he knows there’s peril out there in the galaxy, and he’s exiled himself way out here and taken himself out of it. So I had to figure out why. And I knew because it was Luke Skywalker, who I grew up with as a hero, I knew the answer couldn’t be cowardice. So I knew the answer had to be something active, he couldn’t just be hiding. It had to be something positive. He thinks he’s doing the right thing.

“And that kind of led to…the notion that he’s come to the conclusion from all the given evidence that the Jedi are not helping. They’re just perpetuating this kind of cycle. They need to go away so that the light can rise from a more worthy source. So suddenly that turned his exile from something where he’s hiding and avoiding responsibility to him kind of taking the weight of the world on his shoulders and bearing this huge burden of know his friends are suffering. And because he thinks its the bigger and better thing for the galaxy, he’s choosing to not engage with it.”

I Say: The notion that they handed this series off to Johnson without a plan, or answers to certain questions, is flabbergasting to me. Supposedly, that is indeed what happened. He sat down and wrote this movie with no idea why Luke had exiled himself, who Rey’s family was, who Snoke was, or any of that. He had to create his own answers. So I can sympathize with the position he was apparently put in.

The reason he came up with for Luke’s exile was fine. I like it a lot, in fact. I can certainly appreciate that it wasn’t simply cowardice. What I, and certainly numerous others, did not appreciate was the comedic chucking of the lightsaber over the cliff. That moment between Luke and Rey at the end of The Force Awakens had so much weight to it. It was the first time we’d seen Luke since Return of the Jedi. He was shocked to see this new person who’d discovered him, and Rey was vulnerable, silently asking for his guidance. It was a cliffhanger suitable to end the movie, and one we waited two damn years to get the payoff for…

It’s not Luke’s rejection of the weapon, and thus Rey’s question, that irks me. It’s the tonality of it. Instead of having Luke toss it, why not just let it drop to his feet? It’s less heavy-handed (no pun intended), and subtly speaks to his refusal to take on the responsibility of being a hero. Instead, he just tosses the weapon away like a discarded soda can or something. To do it the way they did was almost disrespectful to The Force Awakens

Follow Primary Ignition on Twitter, or email Rob at primaryignition@yahoo.com.

Posted in Movies

Spider-Man: Far From Home Trailer Ponderings…

By Rob Siebert
Fanboy Wonder

So the Spider-Man: Far From Home trailer hit the web today.

HA! Hit the web. See what I did?

Anyway, here are some thoughts. Because that’s what we internet fanboys do. We give thoughts on things, whether you want them or not…

– Given all the hype Into the Spider-Verse has gotten recently, including the Golden Globe Award for Best Animated Feature, it’s a little weird to already be talking about another Spider-Man flick. Incidentally, I’m ashamed to say I haven’t seen Into the Spider-Verse yet. Especially because it’s probably going to end up being a better movie than this one.

– I’ll give the Marvel folks credit, though. They’re doing things that haven’t been done in these Spidey movies before. It would have been really easy to just drop him in New York again. But the whole field trip story is a nice twist on things. Hey, wait a minute…this was also the story for The Lizzy McGuire Movie!!!

– I confess, when Jake Gyllenhaal first appeared in the Mysterio costume, I thought he’d been displaced from a Thor movie. He looks good enough, I suppose. He’d better, as Mysterio is one of the last big Spider-Man villains they haven’t brought to the big screen yet. I mean, who do we have left? Kraven the Hunter? Carnage, but they obviously want him in the next Venom movie. So who does that leave? Hobgoblin? Meh…

– The inclusion of Nick Fury in this movie reminds me of a scene in the old Bendis/Bagley Ultimate Spider-Man comic. Fury implies that when Peter turns 18, he’ll be working for S.H.I.E.L.D. whether he wants to or not. It’s a great little moment that they paid off several issues later. It’d be interesting if we got a little something like that here.

– Tom Holland is a damn good Spider-Man. Probably the best one yet. From me, that’s really saying something, as I loved Tobey Maguire in that role. Incidentally, now that Into the Spider-Verse has become a hit, what are the odds of bringing Tobey back into the franchise in some form? As like an alt-universe Spidey? Hell, bring Andrew Garfield back too, if it makes sense. But mainly, I want Tobey back.

– Full disclosure: I know next to nothing about Zendaya. I saw her in Homecoming, and I saw her in The Greatest Showman. That’s it. But I really like her as Mary Jane. It feels like a fresher take on the character. Plus, she and Holland have good chemistry.

– So Marisa Tomei is apparently doing the will they/won’t they dance with the Jon Favreau character. That’s the spot formerly occupied by Tony Stark. Hate to say it kids, but might mean Tony is bitin’ the big one in Endgame. Get your tissues ready.

Follow Primary Ignition on Twitter, or email Rob at primaryignition@yahoo.com.

Posted in Movies

Rian Johnson on The Last Jedi: “…About His Mother.”

***Lots of people have lots of opinions about Star Wars: The Last Jedi. You have one. I have one. But you know whose opinion I want to hear? Rian Johnson’s. He wrote it. He directed it. Now let’s hear what he has to say about it. That’s what this space is for. This is “Rian Johnson on The Last Jedi.“***

By Rob Siebert
Fanboy Wonder

The Scene: During the film’s opening sequence, General Hux talks to Poe Dameron via comm link. Dameron makes an antagonistic allusion to Hux’s mother.

Rian Johnson Says (Via The Last Jedi Commentary Track): “I held on to this. This was something where I felt like…with the heaviness of it being the middle chapter, and I knew people were going to come in with expectations of all the grand opera of it. And I really wanted this movie to be fun. I love the tone that J.J. [Abrams], Michael [Arndt], and Larry [Kasdan] set with The Force Awakens. And the tone of the original films has a spirit of fun to it. I felt like we had to, at the very beginning, kind of break the ice and say we’re going to have fun here. We’re going to try some fun stuff, and it’s going to be okay to laugh at this movie. So we kind of start it with a little Monty Python sketch.”

I Say: He’s not wrong about the original movies having that fun spirit to them. Just a few minutes into the original movie, Threepio and Artoo comedically rush through a barrage of blaster fire. So we can’t say that humor hasn’t been part of the franchise’s DNA from the get-go. Frankly, a lot of The Last Jedi‘s jokes landed with me. Still, I wonder if given the chance to go back and chance things, Rian Johnson wouldn’t take that “…about his mother” line out.

Follow Primary Ignition on Twitter, or email Rob at primaryignition@yahoo.com.

Posted in Movies, Television, Voice Acting

10 Things You Need to Know About Bird Box

By Rob Siebert
Fanboy Wonder

My latest voiceover gig has gone live. Once again, it’s hosted by the folks over at Fandom. This time, it’s “10 Things You Need to Know About Sandra Bullock’s Bird Box.”

The post-apocalyptic thriller, which came to Netflix December 21, also features Sarah Paulson, John Malkovich, Danielle Macdonald, and Machine Gun Kelly.

Here’s the trailer…

And because now is as good a time as any for a shameless plug, I’d love for you to check out my previous gig over at Fandom, “9 Shocking Rick Grimes Moments on The Walking Dead.”

Follow Primary Ignition on Twitter, or email Rob at primaryignition@yahoo.com.

Posted in Movies

YouTube Spotlight: Star Wars and the Catholic Church

By Rob Siebert
Fanboy Wonder

The other day, I stumbled across this video from the folks at Wisecrack, a channel that examines pop culture through a philosophical lens. It makes the extravagant, though not altogether inappropriate comparison between the Star Wars fandom and social systems facing a legitimation crisis. Case in point, fans rebelling against the direction Disney is taking the Star Wars franchise.

The most concrete comparison the video uses is to the legitimation crisis faced by the Catholic Church in the 1500s. The invention of the printing press allowed the masses to get their hands on more hard copies of the Bible, and thus develop their own interpretations of the text. At first, it’s an easy comparison to scoff at. But the video does a pretty convincing sell job. And the points it makes have stuck with me. So clearly it did something right.

Check it out for yourself, and may the Force be with you!

Follow Primary Ignition on Twitter, or email Rob at primaryignition@yahoo.com.

Posted in Movies

Ghostbusters 3: Here We Go Again…

By Rob Siebert
Fanboy Wonder

Dan Aykroyd made a few headlines last week when he made the following comments to Dan Rather about a proper Ghostbusters 3 with the original cast, and how a sequel to the 2016 Ghostbusters remake isn’t happening.

A few thoughts…

Did we really need confirmation that the 2016 movie wasn’t getting a sequel? My review of Paul Feig’s Ghostbusters movie is one of the few reviews I’ve done that I wish I could take back. I essentially said, “It’s not the movie I wanted. But that’s okay.” I think a lot of critics were afraid to be honest about that movie for fear of being labeled anti-woman, anti-feminist, or whatever. The movie was bad, but that had nothing to do with the performers being women. It just wasn’t funny. It absolutely screamed “sleazy, desperate cash grab.” Could it have been great? Absolutely. But it wasn’t.

It’s actually pretty funny that the Ghostbusters 3 rumor mill has started up again, even after a third Ghostbusters movie has come and gone.

As someone who loves both the original movies, I think it’s cool that they still want to try a proper sequel of sorts. It feels a little dirty to be doing it without Harold Ramis. But there are stories they can tell, and ways they can make something funny, sentimental, and ultimately worthy of what’s come before.

That being said, the fact that it’s being written doesn’t mean much. Ghostbusters 3 has been synonymous with “development hell” for nearly 30 years now. I see no reason why now should be any different.

But If we are going to make this movie, let’s not get hung up on Bill Murray this time, okay?

I love the guy as much as anyone, and he’s as responsible as anyone for the original Ghostbusters being what it is. But if they have a chance to make another good Ghostbusters movie without him, then that’s what they should do. Get one or two strong new leads, and throw them in there with Aykroyd, Ernie Hudson, Annie Potts, and whoever else fits naturally into the story. Let’s see if bustin’ can make us feel good again…

Follow Primary Ignition on Twitter, or email Rob at primaryignition@yahoo.com.

Posted in Comic Books/Graphic Novels, Movies

TMNT Fan Series Back in the Shell – Just One Question…

By Rob Siebert
Fanboy Wonder

Falling down a social media rabbit hole yesterday, I stumbled across this little treat. A behind the scenes look at an upcoming six-episode Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles fan series called Back in the Shell

The series is coming to us courtesy of the folks at Nerdbot. The Turtle suits are coming from Prop Shop Garage, who make some stellar looking TMNT costumes akin to the ones in the old ’90s flicks, which  Back in the Shell is obviously trying to capture the spirit of. (As if that track from Spunkadelic wasn’t a dead give-away!) A teaser is is being advertised for next week. You can officially call me intrigued, dudes and dudettes.

I do have one question, though.

This is a fan-series, undoubtedly made with a fraction of the money used to make the Paramount/Nickelodeon TMNT movies. So how is it that this, a teaser for a teaser, can get me more excited than those two movies did? Not individually, mind you. Combined.

The answer is pretty obvious to me. But I’ll let you decide for yourself.

For more on Back in the Shell, check out its official Instagram page, as well as Team Ninja Turtle on Facebook.

Follow Primary Ignition on Twitter, or email Rob at primaryignition@yahoo.com!